177

Oh, to See the Dawn

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

See the narratives behind the hymn – Matthew 27:31-56, Mark 15:20-41, Luke 23:26-46, and John 19:18-30.
For the strong confidence with which this song concludes, see Galatians 6:14-15.

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

This song reflects the narrative of the suffering and death of Christ on Calvary, events whose significance and purpose is deepened by the confessions of the church. Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Days 15-16, Questions and Answers 37-44 explain the significance of each step of his suffering. Question and Answer 40 testifies that Christ had to suffer death “because God’s justice and truth require it; nothing else could pay for our sins except the death of the son of God.”
 

The Belgic Confession, Article 20 professes that “God made known his justice toward his Son…poured out his goodness and mercy on us…giving to us his Son to die, by a most perfect love, and raising him to life for our justification, in order that by him we might have immortality and eternal life.”
Consider also the testimony of Belgic Confession, Article 21: “He endured all this for the forgiveness of our sins.”

177

Oh, to See the Dawn

Tune Information

Name
OH, TO SEE THE DAWN
Key
C Major
Meter
10.8.10.6 refrain 6.6.6.8

Recordings

177

Oh, to See the Dawn

Hymn Story/Background

Stuart Townend and Keith Getty have written a number of songs that are based on the Apostle’s Creed. When dwelling on the line, “He suffered under Pontius Pilate,” they were convicted that Christians often struggle to focus on the reality of Christ’s suffering at more than just a surface level in worship. In Communion we are commanded to remember Christ’s death until he comes again. Townend and Getty thus wrote this Easter or Communion hymn to give the church words to say when reflecting on the suffering of Christ.
— Laura de Jong

Author and Composer Information

Stuart Townend (b. 1963) grew up in West Yorkshire, England, the youngest son of an Anglican vicar. He started learning piano at a young age, and began writing music at age 22. He has produced albums for Keith Routledge and Vinesong, among many others, and has also released eight solo albums to date. Some of his better-known songs include “How Deep the Father’s Love,” “The King of Love,” and “The Power of the Cross.” He continues to work closely with friends Keith and Kristyn Getty, and is currently a worship leader in Church of Christ the King in Brighton, where he lives with wife Caroline, and children Joseph, Emma and Eden.
 
Keith Getty (b. December 16, 1974) developed a passion for writing good songs for the church in his twenties, and began writing for his small Baptist church. He is passionate about writing theologically astute lyrics and tunes that are easy to sing. Growing up in Ireland, he now lives with his wife Kristyn and daughter Eliza Joy in Nashville. Getty writes and performs predominantly with Kristyn, and the couple regularly tour the United States and the United Kingdom.
— Laura de Jong
Hymnary.org does not have a score for this hymn.