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Miren qué bueno (Oh, Look and Wonder)

Scripture References

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 21, Question and Answer 55 professes “the communion of the saints,” by which we mean that “each member should consider it a duty to use [their] gifts readily and joyfully for the service and enrichment of the other members.”
 
The Belhar Confession, Section 2 testifies that the unity of God’s children becomes active “in a variety of ways; in that we love one another, that we experience, practice and pursue community with one another...”

Additional Prayers

O God, let the overflowing of your Holy Spirit
cover your church with the blessing of unity
and the anointing of your peace,
through our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.
 

Tune Information

Name
MIREN QUÉ BUENO
Key
C Major
Meter
Irregular

Recordings

Musical Suggestion

It seems that every generation has to learn that same lesson. In our day of fast travel and vast movements of people as immigrants and refugees, the church needs not only to profess “one holy catholic church” but to model our unity in Christ in our own congregations. One beautiful way to demonstrate our unity in Christ is to sing songs that come from Christians in different lands, languages, and cultures. An even more direct expression of unity comes when we plan combined services with different groups who often worship apart.
 
Notice that the short refrain is sung twice each time. Get a little brave; sing it in both languages, first in Spanish, then in English! Let loose with all kinds of percussion instruments—claves, maracas, drums, and more. With the claves, use different patterns, trying not to duplicate the melodic rhythm.
(from Reformed Worship, Issue 53)
— Emily Brink

Regardless of which language the stanzas are sung in, the refrain should be sung first in Spanish and then repeated in English.

Author and Composer Information

Pablo Sosa (b. 1933) grew up and was educated in Argentina, the U.S. (Westminster Choir College), and Germany. For years he pastored a large Methodist congregation in Buenos Aires, Argentina while composing songs, leading choirs, editing hymnals, producing religious broadcasts, and teaching liturgy and hymnology at a seminary. 
 
Meanwhile, life in Argentina pushed him to question his assumptions about what’s best for congregational singing. During Argentina’s “dirty war,” two young women from his church were disappeared, possibly for working among the poor. As Catholic and Protestant churches hesitated whether to speak outremain silent, or support the government, many people lost faith. Economic meltdown after the war plunged many middle-class Argentinians into poverty. Sosa’s growing social awareness widened his vision for “lifting up hope with a song.” He often describes worship as “the fiesta of the faithful,” where all are welcome and all music is seen as “part of the ‘song of the earth,’ which answers the psalmist’s call ‘Sing joyfully to God, all the earth!’ (Psalm 98:4).” 
 
Whether in his home church, Iglesia Evangélica Metodista La Tercera (Third Methodist Church) in Buenos Aires, or at churches or conferences around the world, he urges people, “Put your body into worship!” And he reminds them of the biblical connection between justice and worship.