37

Te exaltaré (I Will Exalt) (Psalm 145:1-5)

Scripture References

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

From the beginning of time, each generation has been called to celebrate God’s works and words. Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 2 claims “from the beginning through all the crises of our times, until the kingdom fully comes, God keeps covenant forever...” This is a truth that truly needs to resound in all times and in all places.
37

Te exaltaré (I Will Exalt) (Psalm 145:1-5)

Introductory/Framing Text

Great God, we exalt and worship you.
In Christ you offer us everything we need.
Embolden us to go out into the streets and alleys of our world,
urging others to come to your banqueting house;
and there may we discover the table of forgiveness and healing, of laughter and joy.
We ask this in Jesus’ name. Amen.
37

Te exaltaré (I Will Exalt) (Psalm 145:1-5)

Tune Information

Name
ECUADOR
Key
d minor or modal
Meter
irregular

Recordings

Musical Suggestion

"Te Exaltaré" is one of the forty-six songs in Celebremus II, produced by a task force representing Hispanic congregations and musicians and by the Section on Worship of the Board of Discipleship of The United Methodist Church. We know nothing about the origin of this particular song, but it is well known among Spanish-speaking Christians.
 
In style, "Te Exaltaré" is similar to the African song "Jesus, We Love to Meet," Bruno Nettl writes: "The development of characteristic and memorable rhythms that became the basis of Latin American popular dances-the rumba, samba, and conga-was probably made possible by the fact that both the West African and the Hispanic traditions favored complicated, driving rhythms with steady pulsating patterns" (Folk and Traditional Music of the Western Continents, p. 189).
 
The text is taken from the opening verses of Psalm 145, a joyful song of praise. This song would serve well as a hymn of dedication and offering, or anytime when praise is appropriate. The hymn has an infectious beat; don't be surprised if you catch yourself singing it at home or in the car!
 
Suggestions for introducing the hymn follow:
  • Week 1. Have the youth choir accompanied with guitars and piano, present the song to the congregation. The song may be sung in English or in Spanish-or one time through in each language. Use percussion instruments to add to the festive joy of this psalm.
  • Week 2. The youth choir sings the hymn the first time through the congregation joins them on the second singing.
  • Week 3. If you live near a Spanish-speaking congregation, you may wish to plan a joint bilingual service, in which the hymn is sung in both languages. The joy of singing this song might spill over into additional fellowship as you exalt together the greatness of the Lord. 
(from Reformed Worship, Issue 4)
— Emily Brink
Hymnary.org does not have a score for this hymn.