472

O Morning Star, O Radiant Sun

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

See how the phrase “morning star son of the dawn” is found in Isaiah 14:12, but there it is referring to the fall of Babylon (and Satan).
See also the primary references of Psalms 31:14-15,  39:4-6, 90:7-17 and Psalm 144.
Also note James 4:13-18.

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 19, Question and Answer 52 professes that “in all distress and persecution, with uplifted head, I confidently await the very judge who has already offered himself to the judgment of God in my place and removed the whole curse from me. Christ will cast all his enemies and mine into everlasting condemnation, but will take me and all his chosen ones to himself into the joy and glory of heaven.”
 

Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 57 describes what believers can expect to experience: “…We will see our Savior face to face…he will set all things right…we face that day without fear for the Judge is our Savior whose shed blood declares us righteous. We live confidently, anticipating his coming...”

472

O Morning Star, O Radiant Sun

Additional Prayers

Praise be to you, O God, for you have given us in Christ every spiritual blessing
and have delivered us from the powers of sin and death.
By your Spirit’s power help us in the struggle to bring all things into conformity
with your kingdom of righteousness and peace. Amen.
472

O Morning Star, O Radiant Sun

Tune Information

Name
O HEILAND, REISS DIE HIMMEL AUF
Key
d minor or modal
Meter
8.8.8.8

Recordings

472

O Morning Star, O Radiant Sun

Hymn Story/Background

O HEILAND, REISS DIE HIMMEL AUF is a German chorale melody published anonymously in Rheinfelsisches Deutsches Catholisches Gesangbuch (1666 ed.). Psalter Hymnal 1987 Revision Committee member Dale Grotenhuis prepared the harmonization in 1985.
— Bert Polman

Author Information

Friedrich von Spee (b. Kaiserwerth, Germany, February 25, 1591; d. Trier, Germany, August 7, 1635) son of Peter Spee (of the family of Spee, of Langenfeld), judge at Kaisers worth, was educated in the Jesuit gymnasium (highschool) at Cologne, entered the order of the Jesuits there on September 22, 1610, and was ordained priest about 1621. From 1613 to 1624 he was one of the tutors in the Jesuit college at Cologne, and was then sent to Paderborn to assist in the Counter Reformation. In 1627 he was summoned by the Bishop of Würzburg to act as confessor to persons accused of witchcraft, and, within two years, had to accompany to the stake some 200 persons, of all ranks and ages, in whose innocence he himself firmly believed (His Cautio criminalis, sen de processibus contra sagas lib, Rinteln, 1631, was the means of almost putting a stop to such cruelties). He was then sent to further the Counter Reformation at Peine near Hildesheim, but on April 29, 1629, he was nearly murdered by some persons from Hildesheim. In 1631 he became professor of Moral Theology at Cologne. The last years of his life were spent at Trier, where, after the city had been stormed by the Spanish troops on May 6, 1635, he contracted a fever from some of the hospital patients to whom he was ministering, and died there Aug. 7, 1635. Spee was the first important writer of sacred poetry that had appeared in the German Roman Catholic Church since the Reformation. Among his contemporaries he was noteworthy for the beauty of his style, and his mastery of rhythm and metre. 

Martin Louis Seltz (b. Gibbon, Minnesota, December 20, 1909; d. Hennepin County, Minnesota, October, 5, 1967) was a Lutheran pastor who graduated from Concordia College (now University, and where he later taught from 1929-1931) in St. Paul, and Concordia Seminary in St. Louis. He served several churches in New Jersey, Minnesota, and Iowa. He was also a musician, serving as director of different choral organizations in Minnesota, Iowa and Pennsylvania. He was editor of the North Star Song Book (1945) and served on both the Luthern Church—Missouri Synod Commission on Worship and the Inter-Lutheran Commission on Worship. He was the father of Martin A. Seltz, currently publisher for worship and music at Augsburg Fortress.

Martin Tel (b. 1967) is the C. F. Seabrook Director of Music at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey. He conducts the seminary choirs, teaches courses in church music, and administers the music for the daily seminary worship services. He served as senior editor of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship (2012). His love for music began in a dairy barn in rural Washington State, where he heard his father belt out psalms and hymns while milking the cows. Martin earned degrees in church music and theology from Dordt College, the University of Notre Dame, Calvin Theological Seminary, and the University of Kansas. He has served as minister of music in Christian Reformed, Reformed Church in America, and Presbyterian congregations. With his wife, Sharilyn, he is raising three children in Princeton.

Composer Information

Dale Grotenhuis (b. Cedar Grove, WI, 1931; d. Jenison, Mi, August 17, 2012) was a member of the 1987 Psalter Hymnal 1987 Revision Committee, and was professor of music and director of choral music at Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa, from 1960 until he retired in 1994 to concentrate on composition. Educated at Calvin College; Michigan State University, Lansing; and Ohio State University, Columbus; he combined teaching with composition throughout his career and was a widely published composer of choral music. He also directed the Dordt choir in a large number of recordings, including many psalm arrangements found in the 1959 edition of the Psalter Hymnal.
— Bert Polman
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