501

LORD, Our Lord, Your Glorious Name

Scripture References

Thematically related:

Further Reflections on Scripture References

God's glory displayed in the heavens inspires the psalmist and us to proclaim the greatness of Cod's name (st. 1, refrain). So great is the LORD's name and glory "in all the earth" that praise from even the weakest members of society, infants and chil­dren, will silence God's enemies (st. 2). The starry heaven's majesty shows what puny creatures human beings are (st. 3), and yet the One who fashioned the moon and stars has also crowned humans with almost godlike glory and honor (st. 4), appointing them to authority over all creation (st. 5)-this thought evokes in the poet a wonder that refuses to be silent. New Testament writers see these divine appointments for humanity fully realized only in Jesus Christ (Heb. 2:5-9). The Psalter Hymnal versifi­cation is from the 1912 Psalter.
 
Bert Polman, Psalter Hymnal Handbook

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

God’s creative power, on display all around us, both obligates us and motivates us to give him worship. His work of creating all, and his constant care for all of it, stirs us in thanksgiving. Belgic Confession, Articles 12 and 13 spell these truths out beautifully: “We believe that the Father, when it seemed good to him, created heaven and earth and all other creatures from nothing, by the Word—that is to say, by the Son…”
 
Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 9 and 10, Questions and Answers 26-28 do the same: “…the eternal Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who out of nothing created heaven and earth…”
 

Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 1 identifies the exclamation that gives us joy: “Our World Belongs to God!” and then in paragraph 8 testifies that “In the beginning, God—Father, Word, Spirit—called this world into being out of nothing, and gave it shape and order.”

501

LORD, Our Lord, Your Glorious Name

Additional Prayers

Creator God, heavenly Father,
you alone know why you love your people, and in you alone we can love one another.
By your Spirit, help us to find our true worth, not in other created things, but in you.
Keep us faithful in our care for your world and in our compassion for your people.
We pray this in the name of Jesus, creation’s Redeemer. Amen.
Psalms for All Seasons, Psalm 8
501

LORD, Our Lord, Your Glorious Name

Tune Information

Name
GOTT SEI DANK DURCH ALLE WELT
Key
C Major
Meter
7.7.7.7

Recordings

501

LORD, Our Lord, Your Glorious Name

Hymn Story/Background

God's glory displayed in the heavens inspires the psalmist and us to proclaim the greatness of God's name (st. 1, refrain). So great is the LORD's name and glory "in all the earth" that praise from even the weakest members of society, infants and chil­dren, will silence God's enemies (st. 2). The starry heaven's majesty shows what puny creatures human beings are (st. 3), and yet the One who fashioned the moon and stars has also crowned humans with almost godlike glory and honor (st. 4), appointing them to authority over all creation (st. 5)-this thought evokes in the poet a wonder that refuses to be silent. New Testament writers see these divine appointments for humanity fully realized only in Jesus Christ (Heb. 2:5-9). This versifi­cation is from the 1912 Psalter.
— Bert Polman

Author Information

The 1912 Psalter was the first ecumenical psalter published in the United States and the most widely used metrical psalter of the twentieth century in North America.  The United Presbyterian Church invited all other Reformed and Presbyterian denominations to join them in the effort to provide a new versifications of the psalms; six Presbyterian denominations, as well as the Christian Reformed Church and the Reformed Church in America joined in the effort in revising the 1887 Psalter (whose texts actually dated back to the 1871 Book of Psalms; the 1887 edition had added music to the texts.).  The 1912 Psalter included all the psalms in 413 settings, eight doxologies, and the three Lukan canticles (Song of Mary, Song of Zechariah, and Song of Simeon).
— Bert Polman and Jack Reiffer

Composer Information

Johann Anastasius Freylinghausen, son of Dietrich Freylinghausen (b. Bad Gandersheim, Germany, December 2, 1670; d. Halle, Germany, February 12, 1739), merchant and burgomaster at Gandersheim, Brunswick, was born at Gandersheim, Dec. 2, 1670. He entered the University of Jena at Easter, 1689. Attracted by the preaching of A. H. Francke and J. J. Breithaupt, he moved to Erfurt in 1691, and at Easter, 1692, followed them to Halle. About the end of 1693 he returned to Gandersheim, and employed himself as a private tutor. In 1695 he went to Glaucha as assistant to Francke; and when Francke became pastor of St. Ulrich's, in Halle, 1715, Freylinghausen became his colleague, and in the same year married his only daughter. In 1723 he became also sub-director of the Paedagogium and the Orphanage; and after Francke's death in 1727, succeeded him as pastor of St. Ulrich's and director of the Francke Institutions. Under his fostering care these Institutions attained their highest development. From a stroke of paralysis in 1728, and a second in 1730, he recovered in great measure, but a third in 1737 crippled his right side, while the last, in Nov., 1738, left him almost helpless. He died on Feb. 12, 1739, and was buried beside Francke (Koch, vi. 322-334; Allgemine Deutsche Biographie, vii. 370-71; Bode, pp. 69-70; Grote's Introduction, &c.)
— John Julian Dictionary of Hymnology
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