509

Come, Worship God

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

The Levites sang Psalm 95 in the liturgy of a high festival celebrating the cosmic rule of the Lord. World leaders call the congregation of God’s people to praise the Lord (st. 1) as the one true God and the King of all creation (st. 2). As Israel’s Maker and Shepherd, the Lord is to be worshiped reverently and served in humble obedience (st. 3). Therefore we are to listen to God’s word and rejoice in God’s goodness (st. 4).
 
Sing! A New Creation

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

We celebrate with joy that Christ has come to rescue us from sin and evil through the work of his son, Jesus Christ. Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 35 identifies the church as “the fellowship of those who confess Jesus as Lord…the bride of Christ…”
 
Belgic Confession, Article 21 professes how Jesus Christ is a high priest forever and provided for the cleansing of our sins; Article 10 proclaims him as the “true eternal God, the Almighty, whom we invoke, worship and serve.” Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 1, Question and Answer 2 calls us to “live and die in the joy of this comfort” and “to thank God for such deliverance.”
 
In a world with many threats and enemies, we find hope and security in his fatherly care. Both Belgic Confession and Heidelberg Catechism put significant focus on the Providence of God and the care God provides for us. Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 9, Question and Answer 26 professes that he “will provide whatever I need for body and soul” and that we are “completely in his hand.” In Belgic Confession, Article 13 professes that he “watches over us with fatherly care.”
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Come, Worship God

Call to Worship

In your wisdom, O God, you call us here to worship you.
We gather, alive to the Word of God.
You call us to be fully alive with your life abundant,
ready to listen and respond with heart, soul, strength, and mind.
We listen, alive to the Word of God.
You call us to be always watchful for your Word of wisdom,
sometimes startling and unexpected,
sometimes still and quiet,
but always dwelling among us.
We watch and wait for the Word of God.
[Reformed Worship 57:20]

O come, let us sing to the Lord;
let us make a joyful noise to the rock of our salvation!
Let us come into his presence with thanksgiving;
let us make a joyful noise to him with songs of praise!
For the Lord is a great God,
and a great King above all gods.
In his hand are the depths of the earth;
the heights of the mountains are his also.
The sea is his, for he made it,
and the dry land, which his hands have formed.
O come, let us worship and bow down,
let us kneel before the Lord , our Maker!
For he is our God,
and we are the people of his pasture,
and the sheep of his hand.
—Psalm 95:1-7, NRSV
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

Additional Prayers

Holy God—Father, Son, and Spirit,
it is too easy for your people to talk about you without worshiping you,
to worship you without obeying you, and to obey you without joy.
Infuse us with such passion for you that our words become worship,
our desires become obedience,
and our lives reveal the joy that can be found only in you. Amen.
509

Come, Worship God

Tune Information

Name
O QUANTA QUALIA
Key
F Major or modal
Meter
11.10.11.10
509

Come, Worship God

Hymn Story/Background

O QUANTA QUALIA is a chant tune from the Paris Antiphoner of 1681 and represents the "new" breed of French Roman Catholic diocesan tunes of the seventeenth and eigh­teenth centuries. The tune is often associated with Peter Abelard's twelfth-century hymn "O What Their Joy and Their Glory Must Be," which also has a new-heaven-and­-earth focus. The tune name comes from the original Latin incipit of Abelard's text: "O quanta qualia…." 
— Bert Polman

Author Information

Initially studying mathematics and physics at Dulwich College, Michael A. Perry (b. Beckenham, Kent, England, 1942; d. Tonbridge, Kent, England, 1996) was headed for a career in the sciences. However, after one year of study in physics at the University of London, he transferred to Oak Hill College to study theology. He also studied at Ridley Hall, Cambridge, and received a M.Phil. from the University of Southhampton in 1973. Ordained a priest in the Church of England in 1966, Perry served the parish of St. Helen's in Liverpool as a youth worker and evangelist. From 1972 to 1981 he was the vicar of Bitterne in Southhampton and from 1981 to 1989, rector of Eversley in Hampshire and chaplain at the Police Staff College. He then became vicar of Tonbridge in Kent, where he remained until his death from a brain tumor in 1996. Perry published widely in the areas of Bible study and worship. He edited Jubilate publications such as Hymns far Today's Church (1982), Carols far Today (1986), Come Rejoice! (1989), and Psalms for Today (1990). Composer of the musical drama Coming Home (1987), he also wrote more than two hundred hymns and Bible versifications. 
— Bert Polman

Composer Information

As a young child John Bacchus Dykes (b. Kingston-upon-Hull' England, 1823; d. Ticehurst, Sussex, England, 1876)  took violin and piano lessons. At the age of ten he became the organist of St. John's in Hull, where his grandfather was vicar. After receiving a classics degree from St. Catherine College, Cambridge, England, he was ordained in the Church of England in 1847. In 1849 he became the precentor and choir director at Durham Cathedral, where he introduced reforms in the choir by insisting on consistent attendance, increasing rehearsals, and initiating music festivals. He served the parish of St. Oswald in Durham from 1862 until the year of his death. To the chagrin of his bishop, Dykes favored the high church practices associated with the Oxford Movement (choir robes, incense, and the like). A number of his three hundred hymn tunes are still respected as durable examples of Victorian hymnody. Most of his tunes were first published in Chope's Congregational Hymn and Tune Book (1857) and in early editions of the famous British hymnal, Hymns Ancient and Modern.
— Bert Polman
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