549

O Praise the Lord, for It Is Good

Scripture References

Thematically related:

Further Reflections on Scripture References

The people of Jerusalem (v. 2) become the "church" (st. 1) in this hymn-like versification of Psalm 147. With minor alterations in each stanza, the versification comes from the 1912 Psalter
 
Bert Polman, Psalter Hymnal Handbook

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

The God who was active in providing his Son for our redemption, has also been active in the course of history and in the lives of his people. His activity in the course of history began when he created all things. Belgic Confession, Article 12 teaches that God, “when it seemed good to him, created heaven and earth and all other creatures from nothing, by the Word—that is to say, by the Son.” In addition, “God created human beings from the dust of the earth and made and formed them in his image and likeness.”
 
His activity also includes his constant care for all he has created. “…He watches over us with fatherly care, sustaining all creatures under his lordship” (Belgic Confession, Article 13). Additionally, God reveals himself by this “creation, preservation and government of the universe, since that universe is before our eyes like a beautiful book...” (Belgic Confession, Article 2).
 

We also believe that God’s mighty acts are revealed “in the unfolding of covenant history…witnessing to the news that Our World Belongs to God and he loves it deeply” (Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 33). Primary among these actions in the unfolding of covenant history is “the long road of redemption to reclaim the lost as his people and the world as his kingdom” (paragraph 18). As God’s people observe his work in their lives and in history they respond with praise and adoration.

549

O Praise the Lord, for It Is Good

Additional Prayers

We worship you, O God, builder, healer, counter of stars.
We sing praise to you, O God, provider, delighter, protector of your people.
You give us life and joy through your Son.
By the power of your Spirit may we never stop rejoicing in you. Amen.
549

O Praise the Lord, for It Is Good

Tune Information

Name
MINERVA
Key
G Major or modal
Meter
8.6.8.6 D
549

O Praise the Lord, for It Is Good

Hymn Story/Background

The people of Jerusalem (v. 2) become the "church" (st. 1) in this hymn-like versification of Psalm 147. With minor alterations in each stanza, the versification comes from the 1912 Psalter.
 
John H. Stockton composed MINERVA for one of his own gospel-hymn texts, "Come, Every Soul by Sin Oppressed." The tune was published in his Salvation Melodies No.1 (1874); however, it had also been published earlier in Joyful Songs Nos. 1-3 Combined (1869) with the note "arr. by W. G. Fischer, by permission."
 
The significance of the tune title MINERVA is unknown, unless for some reason it refers to the mythical Roman goddess of wisdom. It is also sometimes known as STOCK­TON, after its composer.
 
MINERVA is a simple tune in ABB'B form with one consistent rhythmic pattern and the simple harmonization common to many gospel hymns–and thus is easy for guitar. Sing this tune in harmony at a lively tempo using crisp rhythms over a legato organ pedal. 
— Bert Polman

Author Information

The 1912 Psalter was the first ecumenical psalter published in the United States and the most widely used metrical psalter of the twentieth century in North America.  The United Presbyterian Church invited all other Reformed and Presbyterian denominations to join them in the effort to provide a new versifications of the psalms; six Presbyterian denominations, as well as the Christian Reformed Church and the Reformed Church in America joined in the effort in revising the 1887 Psalter (whose texts actually dated back to the 1871 Book of Psalms; the 1887 edition had added music to the texts.).  The 1912 Psalter included all the psalms in 413 settings, eight doxologies, and the three Lukan canticles (Song of Mary, Song of Zechariah, and Song of Simeon).
— Bert Polman and Jack Reiffer

Composer Information

Although born into a Presbyterian home, John H. Stockton (b. New Hope, PA, 1813; d. Philadelphia, PA, 1877) was converted at the age of twenty-one in a Methodist revival meeting. He became a lay preacher in the Methodist Church in 1844 and was ordained in 1857. After serving several pastorates in New Jersey, he retired in 1874 due to ill health. Throughout his ministry he was strongly interested in evangelism and music. When Dwight L. Moody and Ira D. Sankey held their revival meetings in Philadelphia, Stockton assisted them and wrote several gospel songs and tunes for their use. He published two collections of hymns: Salvation Melodies (1874) and Precious Songs (1875).
— Bert Polman
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