555

Let All Creation's Wonders

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

See how Psalm 148 is the primary reference, but a similar thought is found in Psalms 8, 33, 104, and 135. In addition, God’s provocative questions to Job in Job 38-41 aim to stir similar praise, awe and humility. However, back in Genesis 1 and 2 we are motivated to do the same.

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

The God who was active in providing his Son for our redemption, has also been active in the course of history and in the lives of his people. His activity in the course of history began when he created all things. Belgic Confession, Article 12 teaches that God, “when it seemed good to him, created heaven and earth and all other creatures from nothing, by the Word—that is to say, by the Son.” In addition, “God created human beings from the dust of the earth and made and formed them in his image and likeness.”
 
His activity also includes his constant care for all he has created. “…He watches over us with fatherly care, sustaining all creatures under his lordship” (Belgic Confession, Article 13). Additionally, God reveals himself by this “creation, preservation and government of the universe, since that universe is before our eyes like a beautiful book...” (Belgic Confession, Article 2).
 

We also believe that God’s mighty acts are revealed “in the unfolding of covenant history…witnessing to the news that Our World Belongs to God and he loves it deeply” (Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 33). Primary among these actions in the unfolding of covenant history is “the long road of redemption to reclaim the lost as his people and the world as his kingdom” (paragraph 18). As God’s people observe his work in their lives and in history they respond with praise and adoration.

555

Let All Creation's Wonders

Additional Prayers

O God, beginning with the angels and descending through the skies,
your call to worship unites all creation in song.
Give us wisdom and strength, enabling our wholehearted praise,
for you alone are worthy; you alone are Lord. Amen.
555

Let All Creation's Wonders

Tune Information

Name
THAXTED
Key
B♭ Major
Meter
7.6.7.6 triple

Recordings

555

Let All Creation's Wonders

Hymn Story/Background

In 1921 Gustav Holst extracted his THAXTED music from the “Jupiter” movement of his astrological orchestral suite, The Planets, Op. 32; it has been associated as a glorious ABA hymn tune with this and other texts. 
— Bert Polman

Author Information

Martin Leckebusch (b. Leicester, England, 1962) was educated at Oriel College before going on to study Mathematics at Oxford and Numerical Analysis at Brunel University. He and his wife, Jane, have four daughters; their second child, a son, died in 1995. The family live in Gloucester and belong to a Baptist church.
 
Martin’s work in hymnody over the past twenty-five years has resulted in almost 400 hymn texts, of which around half have so far been published by Kevin Mayhew. These include the ever-popular More than Words and Songs of God’s People—books which have cemented his status as a talented and accomplished hymn writer.
 
Martin is keen to see the church equipped for Christian living, and believes that well-crafted and wisely-used contemporary hymns and songs have a vital role to play in that process.

Composer Information

Gustav Holst (b. Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, September 21, 1874, d. London, England, May 25, 1934) was a renowned British composer and musicians. Having studied at Cheltenham Grammar School, he soon obtained a professional position as an organist, and later as choirmaster. In 1892, Holst composed a two-act operetta, which so impressed his father that he borrowed the money to send Holst to the Royal College of Music. Severe neuritis in his right hand later caused him to give up the keyboard, and Holst turned to the trombone and composing. In 1895 Holst met Ralph Vaughan Williams, and the two became lifelong friends. Vaughan Williams helped Holst land his first job as a singing teacher. Holst became very interested in Indian and Hindu culture, and composed a number of operas translated from Sanksrit myths. These were not received well in England, however. Holst is best known for his composition, The Planets, as well as The Hymn of Jesus. The success of these two works garnered Holst the leisure to leave teaching and spend all his time composing. His later works were not met with such great success, however, and Holst’s later years were spent in much weariness, though he continued to write, composing a total of thirty operas. Holst died after an operation left his heart too weak. 
— Laura de Jong
General Settings
Stanza Selection
Voice Selection
Text size:
Music size:
Transpose (Half Steps):
Capo:
Contacting server...
Contacting server...

Questions? Check out the FAQ
This is a preview of your FlexScore.



Advertisements