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Imagine

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

Many passages point to the ability of Christ to hear and see the needs of all. See Matthew 9:35-38; Christ’s parable in Matthew 25:31-46; also the teachings of James in 1:27 and 2:1-19. Many similar teachings are included in Proverbs – 21:13, 28:8, 29:7 and 31:9 among others. 
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Call to Worship

The Lord be with you.
And also with you.
As we enter this season of Advent,
may the love of God the Father, and the grace of Jesus the Son,
and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be and abide with us all.
Amen!
[Reformed Worship 57:4]
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

Words of Praise

A prayer especially mindful of children
King of glory, you are God.
You are powerful.
You rule the entire world.
We praise you because you are so great.
But you became a baby.
You were tiny and weak.
You were just like us.
We praise you because you came,
and we look forward to when you will come again.
In your name we pray. Amen.
[The Worship Sourcebook]
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

Additional Prayers

Gracious God,
sometimes we see your hand in little events,
and sometimes we see it in the broad sweep of history.
Stir our hearts, that we might be people of hope;
help us seek you in your Word;
and keep us from growing weary as we wait—
that we may not miss the glory of your appearing.
Even so, come quickly, Lord Jesus. Amen.
[The Worship Sourcebook]
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two

A prayer especially mindful of children
What can I give him, poor as I am?
If I were a shepherd, I would bring a lamb.
If I were a wise man, I would do my part.
Yet what I can, I give him, give him my heart.
[“In the Bleak Midwinter,” Christina Rossetti (1830-1894). PD ]
— Worship Sourcebook Edition Two
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Tune Information

Name
IMAGINE
Key
F Major or modal

Recordings

Musical Suggestion

Keith also collaborated with his wife Kristyn on “Imagine,” a song of longing that would be very appropriate during Advent or any service where the emphasis is on invitation and healing. The song, written in first-person singular, both invites and addresses those who hunger and thirst and suffer, helping broken people to imagine a new thing. Perhaps this song could be sung in connection with a passage from Isaiah, who called out to the people of Israel when they were lost, helping prepare them for the coming Messiah: “See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the desert and streams in the wasteland” (Isaiah 43:19). Helping people imagine a new thing may provide the context for them to hear good news.
 
But the question can also be addressed to the church: Who among us hears the voice of the hungry, the thirsty? Everyone can be challenged in this song—those longing for someone to help them (that is, everyone!) as well as those committed to helping others see Christ in us.
 
Because of that double meaning, consider having a choir or soloist sing the first time; perhaps another time invite everyone to join on the second stanza. The music is a bit more challenging for congregations, and the text is less like a hymn than the two earlier examples, but this song is still very accessible.
(from Reformed Worship, Issue 81)
— Emily Brink
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Author and Composer Information

Kristyn Getty (b. May 22, 1980) and Keith Getty (b. December 16, 1974) are world-renowned modern hymn writers. Keith developed a passion for writing good songs for the church in his twenties, and began writing for his small Baptist church. Kristyn studied English Literature at Queen’s University of Belfast, and the couple married in 2004. They write and perform together, and regularly tour the United States and the United Kingdom.
— Laura de Jong
Hymnary.org does not have a score for this hymn.



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