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The LORD is King, Enthroned in Might

Scripture References

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

It is vitally important that worshipers understand the role of God’s law among us. God gives his law to us, not so that we can earn his favor by full obedience, for even those converted to God cannot obey this law perfectly. Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 44, Question and Answer 114 says, “In this life even the holiest have only a small beginning of this obedience.” Instead, says Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 2, Question and Answer 3, through this law “we come to know [our] misery.” 
 
Yet in their new life of gratitude, God’s children “with all seriousness of purpose, do begin to live according to all, not only some, of God’s commandments” (Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 44, Question and Answer 114). They measure their good works of gratitude as “those which are done out of true faith, conform to God’s law, and are done for God’s glory” (Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 33, Question and Answer 91). 
 
In other words, though Christ has fulfilled the law for us, “The truth and substance of these things remain for us in Jesus Christ…[and] we continue to use the witnesses drawn from the law and prophets to confirm us in the gospel and to regulate our lives with full integrity for the glory of God according to the will of God” (Belgic Confession, Article 25). Therefore, the Ten Commandments with explanation are included in the third section, “gratitude,” (Lord’s Days 34-44) of Heidelberg Catechism.

Additional Prayers

Holy are you, the Lord Almighty, God who was, and is, and is to come.
Grant us strength and conviction to worship you with our actions as well as our lips,
that at every opportunity we may bring glory to your name,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

A Litany of Acclamation and Summons
O God, lifted above the tumult of earth and the bonfires of the stars, you still bend your ear to us:
O magnify the God of grace who hears his people’s cry.
Lover of music, you dwell inside the singing of angels, saints, and martyrs:
Come with songs before his face, exalt his name on high!
We dwell with sinners; we ourselves are people of unclean lips, and so we keep longing
To see at last, O God, by grace restored from sin
your holy mountain where you in glory reign.  Amen.
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.

Tune Information

Name
ELLACOMBE
Key
A Major
Meter
8.6.8.6 D

Hymn Story/Background

Psalm 99 offers praise for the reign of God, with a particular focus on God’s holiness (a recurring theme in vv. 3, 5, 9). It focuses on a variety of God’s excellencies, including power and authority (vv. 1-3), righteousness and faithfulness (vv. 4-5), and responsiveness to the people (vv. 6-9).
Psalms for All Seasons
 
Published in a chapel hymnal for the Duke of Würtemberg (Gesangbuch der Herzogl, 1784), ELLACOMBE (the name of a village in Devonshire, England) was first set to the words "Ave Maria, klarer und lichter Morgenstern." During the first half of the nine­teenth century various German hymnals altered the tune. Since ELLACOMBE's inclu­sion in the 1868 Appendix to Hymns Ancient and Modern, where it was set to John Daniell's children's hymn "Come, Sing with Holy Gladness," its use throughout the English-speaking world has spread.
 
ELLACOMBE is a rounded bar form (AABA), rather cheerful in character, and easily sung in harmony. Try having a soloist sing the story in stanzas 1 and 2, with the children (or entire congregation) joining in on stanza 3.
— Bert Polman

Author Information

Educated at Pembroke College and Ridley Hall, Cambridge, Timothy Dudley-Smith (b. 1926) has served the Church of England since his ordination in 1950. He has occupied a number of church posi­tions, including parish priest in the diocese of Southwark (1953-1962), archdeacon of Norwich (1973-1981), and bishop of Thetford, Norfolk, from 1981 until his retirement in 1992. He also edited a Christian magazine, Crusade, which was founded after Billy Graham's 1955 London crusade. Dudley-Smith began writing comic verse while a student at Cambridge; he did not begin to write hymns until the 1960s. Many of his several hundred hymn texts have been collected in Lift Every Heart: Collected Hymns 1961-1983 (1984), Songs of Deliverance: Thirty-six New Hymns (1988), and A Voice of Singing (1993). The writer of Christian Literature and the Church (1963), Someone Who Beckons (1978), and Praying with the English Hymn Writers (1989), Dudley-Smith has also served on various editorial committees, including the committee that published Psalm Praise (1973).
— Bert Polman
General Settings
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