765

God of the Word

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

The first half of this song describes the human situation – one of babble, chaos, and loss of meaning – and then asks what can be done. The second half finds answer in the Word of God, and pleads for that Word to “visit us with grace.”
 
Sing! A New Creation

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

This song expresses our confidence in the truth and power of the word, as taught in Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 32 and Belgic Confession, 7: These scriptures are sufficient for they contain the will of God completely and “everything one must believe to be saved is sufficiently taught in it.”
765

God of the Word

Additional Prayers

A Prayer for God to Speak
Great God, at creation you spoke whole worlds into being.
Speak again, O God.
 
You spoke to Moses as one speaks to a friend.
Speak again, O God.
 
You spoke warning and comfort through the prophets.
Speak again, O God.
 
You spoke at last through the Word made flesh.
Speak to us again, great God.
Speak, for your servants are listening in Jesus’ name. Amen.
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
765

God of the Word

Tune Information

Name
SAN FRANCISCO
Key
E Major · G Major or modal
Meter
9.8.9.8.10.10.11.7

Musical Suggestion

This song has a flair for the dramatic, as many of Ken Medema’s compositions do.
 
Form
  • Beginning: The song starts forcefully, with an almost staccato touch. The words are indicators of the style needed.
  • Middle: The key change from E minor to E major signifies a major shift in this song. This shift creates a sound ‘picture’ that interprets the meaning of the text—a sound portraying chaos to a sound portraying order. For the second half of this song, use a more legato, sensitive approach with the accompaniment, possibly slowing the tempo a little. 
— Diane Dykgraaf
765

God of the Word

Hymn Story/Background

The first half of this song describes the human condition—one of babble, chaos, and loss of meaning—and then asks what can be done. The second half finds answers in the Word of God, and pleads for that Word to “visit us in grace.” The tune mirrors the textual content very precisely. The first four musical phrases descend in stepwise motion, giving the questioning lyric a pessimistic tone. But in the middle there is a change from minor to major mode; after which the melody is characterized by triumphant, upward leaps. 
— Emily Brink

Author and Composer Information

Ken Medema (b. Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1943) is a song writer, composer, recording artist, and story-teller through music. Blind from birth, Ken began playing the piano at age five and studied classical music by reading Braille. He graduated from Grand Rapids Christian High School and studied music therapy at Michigan State University in Lansing, Michigan. As a music therapist in both Indiana and New Jersey, he began writing songs for hurting teenagers, an experience that helped to launch a career of writing songs on Christian life that has taken him to venues large and small all over North America and beyond. He responds to what he hears and sees in his heart at particular events, often improvising songs on the spot, offering compassion, honesty and desire for integrity in both worship and life. In 1985 he began Brier Patch Music, which continues to publish his music and recordings, including 26 CDs. 
— Emily Brink
General Settings
Stanza Selection
Voice Selection
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