223. For the Glories of God's Grace

Text Information
First Line: For the glories of God's grace
Title: For the Glories of God's Grace
Versifier: Marie J. Post (1985)
Meter: 77 77
Scripture: 2 Corinthians 5; 2 Corinthians 5:21
Topic: Biblical Names & Places: Adam; Biblical Names & Places: Calvary; Biblical Names & Places: Satan2 more...
Language: English
Copyright: Text © 1987, CRC Publications
Tune Information
Name: MONKLAND
Arranger: John Wilkes (1861)
Adapter: John Antes
Meter: 77 77
Key: B♭ Major
Source: Freylinghausen's Geistreiches Gesangbuch, 1704


Text Information:

Scripture References:
all st. = 2 Cor. 5:18-21

In 2 Corinthians 5: 18-21 the apostle Paul concludes a description of the ministry of reconciliation: we who have received God's reconciliation through Christ now have the joyful task of being God's agents of reconciliation in the world. So we urge others to believe and join us in singing, “We are reconciled to God.” Marie J. Post (PHH 5) composed a poetic summary of this Scripture passage in 1985.

Liturgical Use:
During the service of confession and forgiveness; worship services focusing on justification.

--Psalter Hymnal Handbook

Tune Information:

The tune MONKLAND has a fascinating if complex history. Rooted in a tune for the text "Fahre fort" in Johann A. Freylinghausen's (PHH 34) famous hymnal, Geistreiches Gesangbuch (1704), it then was significantly altered by John Antes (b. Frederick, PA, 1740; d. Bristol, England, 1811) in a Moravian manuscript, A Collection of Hymn Tunes (c. 1800). Antes was a missionary, watchmaker, business manager, and composer. Born near the Moravian community of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, he was trained at the Moravian boys' school and later received religious education and further training as a watchmaker in Herrnhut, Germany. From 1770 to 1781 he served as a missionary in Egypt and from 1783 until his death was the business manager of the Moravian community in Fullneck, England. Although music was his avocation, Antes was a fine composer and musician. Among his compositions are a number of anthems, several string trios, and over fifty hymn tunes.

MONKLAND received its present shape at the hands of John Lees in another Moravian hymnal, Hymn Tunes of the United Brethren (1824). From there John Wilkes (b. England, date unknown; d. England, 1882) simplified it and introduced it to Henry W. Baker (PHH 342), who published it in the English Hymns Ancient and Modern (1861) to his own harvest-theme text, "Praise, O Praise Our God and King." Wilkes named the tune after the village where he was organist and Baker was vicar–Monkland–located near Leominster in Herefordshire, England. Wilkes died around 1882; he should not be confused with the better-known John Bernard Wilkes (1785-1869).

MONKLAND's well-designed melodic contour is a good match for the text. Sing the tune in parts, except on the refrain line, which is appropriately sung in unison.

--Psalter Hymnal Handbook


Media
MIDI file: MIDI
MIDI file: MIDI Preview(Faith Alive Christian Resources)
More media are available on the tune authority page.




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