263. Just as I Am, without One Plea

1 Just as I am, without one plea,
but that thy blood was shed for me,
and that thou bidd'st me come to thee,
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

2 Just as I am, and waiting not
to rid my soul of one dark blot,
to thee, whose blood can cleanse each spot,
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

3 Just as I am, though tossed about
with many a conflict, many a doubt,
fightings and fears within, without,
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

4 Just as I am, thou wilt receive,
wilt welcome, pardon, cleanse, relieve;
because thy promise I believe,
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

Text Information
First Line: Just as I am, without one plea
Title: Just as I Am, without One Plea
Author: Charlotte Elliott (1836)
Publication Date: 1987
Meter: LM
Scripture: John 6:37; Ephesians 2:14; Revelation 22:17; Revelation 22; Ephesians 2
Topic: Commitment & Dedication; Doubt; Confession and Forgiveness
Language: English
Tune Information
Name: WOODWORTH
Composer: William B. Bradbury (1849)
Meter: LM
Incipit: 12335 43234 35524
Key: E♭ Major


Text Information:

Scripture References:
all st. = John 6:37

At the age of 32, Charlotte Elliott (b. Clapham, London, England, 1789; d. Brighton, East Sussex, England, 1871) suffered a serious illness that left her a semi-invalid for the rest of her life. Within a year she went through a spiritual crisis and confessed to the Swiss evangelist Henri A. Cesar Malan (PHH 288) that she did not know how to come to Christ. He answered, "Come to him just as you are." Thinking back on that experience twelve years later, in 1834, she wrote “Just as I Am" as a statement of her faith.

Hymn writing provided a way for Elliot to cope with her pain and depression – she wrote approximately 150 hymns, which were published in her Invalid's Hymn Book (several editions, 1834-1854), Hymns for a Week (1839), and Thoughts in Verse on Sacred Subjects (1869). Many of her hymns reflect her chronic pain and illness but also reveal that faith gave her perseverance and hope.

“Just as I Am" was first published in the 1836 edition of Invalid's Hymn Book with the subheading "Him that cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out" (John 6:37). She added a seventh stanza that same year, when the hymn was also published in her Hours of Sorrow Cheered and Comforted (1836). The Psalter Hymnal prints the four most common stanzas. Widely translated, this hymn has brought consolation to millions.

Liturgical Use:
Service of confession and forgiveness; in response to preaching; for the Lord's Supper; in evangelistic services as a hymn of invitation.

--Psalter Hymnal Handbook

Tune Information:

William B. Bradbury (PHH 114) originally composed WOODWORTH for Elizabeth Scott's text "The God of Love Will Sure Indulge," published in the Mendelssohn Collection (1849). Later Bradbury adapted Elliott's text (originally written as 88 86) by repeating the Words "I come" in order to fit his long-meter tune; he published this adaptation in his Eclectic Tune Book (1860). The union of this text and tune became a standard in the hymnals used by Dwight L. Moody and Ira D. Sankey (PHH 73) and achieved great popularity through use in Billy Graham Crusades as a hymn of invitation.

This simple music is best sung in parts. Use light registration, and keep the tempo moving with two pulses per bar.

--Psalter Hymnal Handbook


Media
MIDI file: MIDI
MIDI file: MIDI Preview(Faith Alive Christian Resources)
More media are available on the text authority and tune authority pages.




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