264. Lord, I Want to Be a Christian

1 Lord, I want to be a Christian
in my heart, in my heart.
Lord, I want to be a Christian in my heart.
In my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be a Christian in my heart.

2 Lord, I want to be more loving
in my heart, in my heart.
Lord, I want to be more loving in my heart.
In my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be more loving in my heart.

3 Lord, I want to be more holy
in my heart, in my heart.
Lord, I want to be more holy in my heart.
In my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be more holy in my heart.

4 Lord, I want to be like Jesus
in my heart, in my heart.
Lord, I want to be like Jesus in my heart.
In my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be like Jesus in my heart.

Text Information
First Line: Lord, I want to be a Christian in my heart
Title: Lord, I Want to Be a Christian
Publication Date: 1987
Meter: PM
Scripture: 1 Thessalonians 3:12-13
Topic: Commitment & Dedication; Love: Our Love for Others; Songs for Children: Hymns (1 more...)
Source: Afro-American spiritual
Language: English
Tune Information
Name: LORD, I WANT TO BE A CHRISTIAN
Meter: PM
Key: E♭ Major
Source: Afro-American spiritual


Text Information:

Scripture References:
st. 2 = 1 Thess. 3:12

In Negro Slave Songs in the United States (1953), Miles Mark Fisher suggests that this African American spiritual could well have originated in Virginia in the 1750s, based on this story from Hanover, Virginia, 1756: "A black slave asked Presbyterian preacher William Davies, 'I come to you, sir, that you may tell me some good things concerning Jesus Christ and my duty to God, for I am resolved not to live any more as I have done. . . Lord [Sir], I want to be a Christian.'" Apparently the story fits well with the ministry style of Davies in Virginia between 1748 and 1759.

Stanza 1 is a prayer expressing the initial desire to become a Christian; the others are prayers for growth in Christian character: to be more loving (st. 2), to be more holy (st. 3), and to be like Jesus (st. 4).

Liturgical Use:
As a hymn of response to hearing the Word of the Lord–the Word that calls for commitment to become a Christian and challenges all of us to mature in our walk with God: stanzas 2 through 4 can be used separately in the service of confession and forgiveness. Use the entire song as a hymn of encouragement or invitation in evangelistic services.

--Psalter Hymnal Handbook

Tune Information:

Both text and tune were first published in Folk Songs of the American Negro (1907), compiled by brothers Frederick Work and John W. Work, Jr. (PHH 476). This music is an example of the slow, sustained, long-phrased tune found in a number of African American spirituals. In the manner of many such spirituals, this is a call-and-response song, in which a soloist (or choir in unison) sings the stanzas (first two lines) and everyone responds by singing the chorus (last two lines) in four-part harmony. The soloist's lines could be sung rather freely, and the rest in more regular rhythm, but not fast. This music is intended to be reverent, with little, if any, accompaniment (perhaps piano).

--Psalter Hymnal Handbook


Media
MIDI file: MIDI
MIDI file: MIDI Preview(Faith Alive Christian Resources)
More media are available on the text authority and tune authority pages.




Advertisements