A day, a day of glory

A day, a day of glory

Author: John Mason Neale
Tune: DAY OF GLORY
Published in 2 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1. A day, a day of glory!
A day that ends our woe!
A day that tells of triumph
Against our vanquished foe!
Yield, summer’s brightest sunrise,
To this December morn:
Lift up your gates, ye princes,
And let the child be born!

2. With Gloria in excelsis
Archangels tell their mirth:
With Kyrie elëyson
Men answer upon earth:
And angels swell the triumph,
And mortals raise the horn,
Lift up your gates, ye princes,
And let the Child be born.

3. He comes, His throne the manger;
He comes, His shrine the stall;
The ox and ass His courtiers,
Who made and governs all:
The House of Bread His birth-place,
The Prince of wine and corn:
Lift up your gates, ye princes,
And let the child be born.

4. Then bar the gates, that henceforth
None thus may passage win,
Because the Prince of Israel
Alone hath entered in:
The earth, the sky, the ocean
His glorious way adorn:
Lift up your gates, ye princes,
And let the child be born.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #1167

Author: John Mason Neale

Neale, John Mason, D.D., was born in Conduit Street, London, on Jan. 24, 1818. He inherited intellectual power on both sides: his father, the Rev. Cornelius Neale, having been Senior Wrangler, Second Chancellor's Medallist, and Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, and his mother being the daughter of John Mason Good, a man of considerable learning. Both father and mother are said to have been "very pronounced Evangelicals." The father died in 1823, and the boy's early training was entirely under the direction of his mother, his deep attachment for whom is shown by the fact that, not long before his death, he wrote of her as "a mother to whom I owe more than I can express." He was educated at Sherborne Grammar School, and was afterwards… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: A day, a day of glory
Author: John Mason Neale

Notes

A day, a day of glory. J. M. Neale. [Christmas.] A carol written expressly for E. Sedding's Antient Christmas Carols, 1860. It is No. 6 of the “Christmas Carole," in 4 stanzas of 8 lines. In 1867 it was reprinted in the People's Hymnal, No. 29.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #1167
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
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