Adam, our father and our head

Adam, our father and our head

Author: Isaac Watts
Tune: ALSTONE
Published in 40 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
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Full Text

1 Adam our father and our head,
Transgressed, and justice doomed us dead;
The fiery law speaks all despair,
There's no reprieve nor pardon there.

2 Call a bright council in the skies;
Seraphs the mighty and the wise,
Speak; are you strong to bear the load,
The weighty vengeance of a God?

3 In vain we ask; for all around
Stand silent through the heavenly ground;
There's not a glorious mind above
Has half the strength, or half the love.

4 But O! unmeasureable grace!
The eternal Son takes Adam's place;
Down to our world the Savior flies,
Stretches his arms, and bleeds, and dies.

5 Amazing work! look down, ye skies,
Wonder and gaze with all your eyes;
Ye saints below and saints above,
And bow to this mysterious love.

The Hartford Selection of Hymns from the most approved authors, 1799

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Adam, our father and our head
Author: Isaac Watts
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Language: English

Notes

Adam, our father and our head. I. Watts. [The Fall.] Appeared in his Horae Lyricae, 1706, in 13 stanzas of 4 lines, and entitled "Jesus the only Saviour." Its use as a complete hymn is unknown. A cento therefrom of 5 stanzas was given in Rippon's Baptist Selection, 1787, No. US, composed of stanzas i., ii., iv., v., and vii. This has passed into common use to a very limited extent.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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The Cyber Hymnal #204
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