All hearts to Thee are open here

All hearts to Thee are open here

Author: James Montgomery
Published in 1 hymnal

Full Text

All hearts to Thee are open here;
All our desires are known;
And we are that which we appear
To Thee, good Lord, alone.

No eye of man can penetrate,
Another's secret mind,
Nor well discern his own estate,
Naked, and poor, and blind.

The entrance of Thy word gives light:
Let it so shine within,
That each may tremble at the sight
Of his unbosom'd sin.

With godly sorrow make him grieve,
Till hope spring out of grief,
And,cry with tears, "Lord, I believe,
Help Thou mine unbelief."

Ah! then reveal Thy pard'ning love,
To young, to old, to all,
And raise Thy banish'd ones above
The misery of their fall.

As sinners to Thy house we came:
As saints may we depart,
In humbler, holier, happier frame
Of soul, and mind, and heart.

Sacred Poems and Hymns

Author: James Montgomery

Montgomery, James, son of John Montgomery, a Moravian minister, was born at Irvine, Ayrshire, Nov. 4, 1771. In 1776 he removed with his parents to the Moravian Settlement at Gracehill, near Ballymena, county of Antrim. Two years after he was sent to the Fulneck Seminary, Yorkshire. He left Fulneck in 1787, and entered a retail shop at Mirfield, near Wakefield. Soon tiring of that he entered upon a similar situation at Wath, near Rotherham, only to find it quite as unsuitable to his taste as the former. A journey to London, with the hope of finding a publisher for his youthful poems ended in failure; and in 1792 he was glad to leave Wath for Shefield to join Mr. Gales, an auctioneer, bookseller, and printer of the Sheffield Register newspap… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: All hearts to Thee are open here
Author: James Montgomery
Language: English


All hearts to Thee are open here. J. Montgomery. [Divine Worship.] Written for the special annual service of the Red Hill Sunday School, Sheffield, held May 12, 1837, and printed on a fly-leaf for the occasion. [M. MSS.] It was included in Montgomery's Original Hymns, 1853, No. 116, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. In J. H. Thom's Hymns, 1858, st. v. is omitted.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)