All praise to Him who dwells in bliss

All praise to Him who dwells in bliss

Author: Charles Wesley (1741)
Tune: ST. SAVIOUR (Baker 11716)
Published in 52 hymnals

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Full Text

1. All praise to Him who dwells in bliss,
Who made both day and night;
Whose throne is darkness, in th'abyss,
Of uncreated light.

2. Each thought and deed His piercing eyes
With strictest search survey;
The deepest shades no more disguise
Than the full blaze of day.

3. Whom Thou dost guard, O King of kings,
No evil shall molest:
Under the shadow of Thy wings,
Shall they securely rest.

4. Thy angels shall around their beds
Their constant stations keep:
Thy faith and truth shall shield their heads,
For Thou dost never sleep.

5. May we, with calm and sweet repose
And heavenly thoughts refreshed,
Our eyelids with the morn's unclose,
And bless the Ever-bless'd.

Amen.

The Hymnal: Published by the authority of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., 1895

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: All praise to Him who dwells in bliss
Author: Charles Wesley (1741)
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English

Notes

All praise to Him who dwells in bliss. C. Wesley. [Evening.] First published in J. Wesley's Collection of Psalms & Hymns, 1741, as "An Evening Hymn," in 5 stanzas of 4 lines. In the Poetical Works of J. & C. Wesley, 1868-72, vol. ii. p. 27, it is repeated without alteration. Although in somewhat extensive use both in Great Britain and America, it has never found a place in the Wesleyan Hymn Book. In the Hymnary, 1872, No. 75, a doxology has been added. Usually it is given in its original form.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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The Cyber Hymnal #212
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