Almighty father of mankind

Full Text

1. Almighty Father of mankind,
On Thee our hopes remain;
And when the day of trouble comes
I shall not trust in vain.

2. In early years Thou wast my guide,
And of my youth the friend;
And as my days began with Thee,
With Thee my days shall end.

3. I know the power in whom I trust,
The arm on which I lean;
He will my Savior ever be
Who has my Savior been.

4. My God, who causedst me to hope
When life began to beat,
And, when a stranger in the world,
Didst guide my wandering feet.

5. Thou wilt not cast me off when age
And evil days descend;
Thou wilt not leave me in despair
To mourn my latter end.

6. Therefore in life I’ll trust in Thee,
In death I will adore;
And after death will sing Thy praise
When time shall be no more.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #42

Author: Michael Bruce

Bruce, Michael, son of a Scottish weaver, was born at Kinnesswood, Portmoak, Kinrossshire, Scotland, March 27,1746, and educated at the village school, Edinburgh University (where he first became acquainted with John Logan), and the Theological Hall of the Associate Synod, held at Kinross, under the Rev. John Swanston, intending ultimately to enter the ministry, a hope which was frustrated by his untimely death. To assist in procuring University fees and maintenance he for some time conducted a school, during the recess, at Gairney Bridge, and subsequently at Forrest Mill, near Tillicoultry. Whilst yet a student he died at Kinnesswood, July 5th, 1767. [Also, see Logan, John] The names of Michael Bruce and John Logan are brought together… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Almighty father of mankind
Author: Michael Bruce


Almighty Father of mankind. M. Bruce. [Providence.] We attribute this hymn to M. Bruce on grounds stated in his Memoir in this work. It was written probably about 1764, and first published in J. Logan's Poems, 1781, No. 3, in 3 stanzas of 4 lines. Its use is not extensive in Great Britain, but it is found in many of the American hymnals. Text from Logan in Dr. Grosart's Works of Michael Bruce, 1865.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)


ST. PETER (Reinagle)

Composed by Alexander R. Reinagle (b. Brighton, Sussex, England, 1799; d. Kidlington, Oxfordshire, England, 1877), ST. PETER was published as a setting for Psalm 118 in Reinagle's Psalm Tunes for the Voice and Pianoforte (c. 1836). The tune first appeared with Newton's text in Hymns Ancient and Mode…

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The Cyber Hymnal #42
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