And Are We Yet Alive

Full Text

1. And are we yet alive,
and see each other's face?
Glory and thanks to Jesus give
for his almighty grace!

2. Preserved by power divine
to full salvation here,
again in Jesus' praise we join,
and in his sight appear.

3. What troubles have we seen,
what mighty conflicts past,
fightings without, and fears within,
since we assembled last!

4. Yet out of all the Lord
hath brought us by his love;
and still he doth his help afford,
and hides our life above.

5. Then let us make our boast
of his redeeming power,
which saves us to the uttermost,
till we can sin no more.

6. Let us take up the cross
till we the crown obtain,
and gladly reckon all things loss
so we may Jesus gain.



Source: The United Methodist Hymnal #553

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Notes

And are we yet alive? C. Wesley. [Meeting of Friends.] From his Hymns and Sacred Poems, 1749, vol. ii., No. 236, in 4 stanzas of 8 lines, and entitled, "At Meeting of Friends." The 3rd stanza is usually omitted, as in the 1780 edition of the Wesleyan Hymn Book, and the revised edition, 1875. It is commonly used as the opening hymn of the Wesleyan Conference. In all English-speaking countries it is a favourite hymn with the Methodist bodies, and in America especially it is included in the collections of various denominations. Original text, Poetical Works, 1868-72, vol. v. p 466.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

DENNIS (Nägeli)

Lowell Mason (PHH 96) arranged DENNIS and first published it in The Psaltery (1845), a hymnal he compiled with George. Webb (PHH 559). Mason attributed the tune to Johann G. Nageli (b. Wetzikon, near Zurich, Switzerland, 1773; d. Wetzikon, 1836) but included no source reference. Nageli presumably pu…

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SILVER STREET

Although this tune is widely attributed to Isaac Smith and was published in Smiths Collection of Psalm Tunes, London, ca. 1780, Smith does not claim to be the composer. The tune also appeared in other books of similar or earlier date. Southern Harmony, 1835 attributes the tune to J. Street. - From T…

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The United Methodist Hymnal #553

Instances

Instances (1 - 5 of 5)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Hymns and Psalms: a Methodist and ecumenical hymn book #707
Singing the Faith #456
Small Church Music #4012Audio
The Cyber Hymnal #168TextScoreAudio
The United Methodist Hymnal #553TextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Include 182 pre-1979 instances



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