Angels! roll the rock away

Full Text

1 Angels, roll the rock away,
Death, yield up the mighty prey:
See! he rises from the tomb,
Glowing with immortal bloom.
Hallelujah.

2 'Tis the Savior, angels, raise
Fame's eternal trump of praise;
Let the earth's remotest bound
Hear the joy-inspiring sound.
Hallelujah.

3 Now, ye saints, lift up your eyes,
Now to glory see him rise,
In long triumph up the sky,
Up to waiting worlds on high.
Hallelujah.

4 Heaven displays her portals wide,
Glorious Savior, through them ride;
King of glory, mount thy throne,
Thy great Father's and thy own.
Hallelujah!

5 Praise him, all ye heavenly choirs,
Praise and sweep your golden lyres;
Shout, O earth, in rapturous song,
Let the strains be sweet and strong.
Hallelujah.

6 Every note with wonder swell,
Sin o'erthrown, and captived hell;
Where is hell's once dreaded king?
Where, O death, thy mortal sting?
Hallelujah.

The Hartford Selection of Hymns from the most approved authors, 1799

Author: Thomas Scott

Thomas Scott was born at Norwich, and was the son of a Dissenting minister. After his education he began his ministerial life at Wartmell, in Norfolk, adding also the labours of school-teaching. Subsequently he changed his pastoral relations several times, spending the last years of his life at Hupton, in Norfolk, where he died in 1776. He was the author of some prose works, several poems, and a few hymns. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Angels! roll the rock away
Author: Thomas Scott
Meter: 7.7.7.7
Language: English

Notes

Angels roll the rock away. T. Scott. [Resurrection and Ascension.] Contributed to Ash & Evans's Bristol Baptist Collection, 1769, as No. 106, where it is headed "The Resurrection and Ascension." It is in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, each stanza being followed by “Hallelujah," and is signed "G.," the signature of Thomas Gibbons; in the 2nd edition it was signed "U." i.e. "unknown," but in later editions, the 3rd, 1778, the signature was Dr. S., and the 5th, 1786, Dr. Sc—tt. In this form it passed through Rippon's Baptist Selection, 1787, into common use both in Great Britain and America, and these stanzas, more or less altered, are still in extensive use. In 1773, T. Scott republished the hymn in his Lyric Poems, &c, as No. 14, with a new first verse,
"Trembling earth gave awful sign,"
and the "Hallelujah" following each line of the first stanza, and with several alterations. Hatfield (Amer.) follows this 1773 text.

In 1775, Dr. Thomas Gibbons sent an altered version of the hymn to the Gospel Magazine, where it appeared in the Sept. number in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. This with further alterations was included in 1784 in his Hymns adapted to Divine Worship, as No. 60, where he notes it as—-"Altered and enlarged from an H. in Messrs. Ash & Evans's Collection, p. 109." The confusion which has arisen respecting the authorship of this hymn is thus accounted for. Its use in one or another of its various forms is very extensive, and especially in America. [William T. Brooke]

--Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

HENDON

HENDON was composed by Henri A. Cesar Malan (b. Geneva, Switzerland, 1787; d. Vandoeuvres, Switzerland, 1864) and included in a series of his own hymn texts and tunes that he began to publish in France in 1823, and which ultimately became his great hymnal Chants de Sion (1841). HENDON is thought to…

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ARIMATHEA (Roper)


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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns: suited to the various occasions of public worship and private devotion #95
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The Cyber Hymnal #185
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