Angels, that high in glory dwell

Angels, that high in glory dwell

Author: Isaac Watts (1715)
Published in 20 hymnals

Full Text

Angels, that high in glory dwell,
Adore thy Name, Almighty God!
And devils tremble down in hell,
Beneath the terrors of thy rod.

64
And yet how wicked children dare
Abuse thy dreadful, glorious Name!
And when they’re angry, how they swear,
And curse their fellows, and blaspheme!

How will they stand before thy face,
Who treated thee with such disdain,
While thou shalt doom them to the place
Of everlasting fire and pain?

Then never shall one cooling drop
To quench their burning tongues be given;
But I will praise thee here, and hope
Thus to employ my tongue in heaven.

My heart shall be in pain to hear
Wretches affront the Lord above:
’Tis that great God whose power I fear,
That heavenly Father whom I love.

If my companions grow profane,
I’ll leave their friendship when I hear
Young sinners take thy Name in vain,
And learn to curse, and learn to swear.



Source: Divine and Moral Songs: attempted in easy language for the use of children with some additional composures #HXIX

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Angels, that high in glory dwell
Author: Isaac Watts (1715)
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Language: English

Notes

Angels that high in glory dwell. I. Watts. [Against Swearing, &c]. First published in his Divine Songs for Children, 1715, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, and entitled ÔÇťAgainst swearing and cursing, and taking God's name in vain." Its modern use is limited, and in the Methodist Free Church Sunday School Hymn Book, No. 228, it is slightly altered.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 20 of 20)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Divine and Moral Songs: attempted in easy language for the use of children with some additional composures #HXIXTextPage Scan
Divine Songs for Children #XIXTextPage Scan
Divine Songs: attempted in easy language, for the use of children #19Page Scan
Hymns additional to the Hymns in the Prayer Book: collected for the Sunday-school of their parishes by the rectors of St. Philip's and St. Jude's churches, Philadelphia #227Page Scan
Hymns for Children and Young Persons. First Am. from the London ed. #d10
Hymns for Schools and Families #d29
Hymns for Schools and Families, Specailly Designed for the Children of the Church #312Page Scan
Hymns for Sunday Schools, Selected from Various Authoors #d18
Hymns for the Use of Children #XIXPage Scan
Hymns for Youth, Suitable to be Used in Sabbath and Parochial Schools #245Page Scan
Sabbath School and Social Hymns of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of the U.S.A. #d15
Selection of Hymns for the Sunday School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church #131Page Scan
Selection of Hymns for the Sunday School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church #177Page Scan
Songs, Divine and Moral #104Page Scan
Sunday School Hymn Book. (19th ed) #157Page Scan
The American Baptist Sabbath-School Hymn-Book #435Page Scan
The Baptist Sabbath School Hymn Book #d32
Union Hymns. Rev. #d26
Union Hymns. Rev. #d28
Watt's Divine Songs For the use of Children #19Page Scan



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