A Hymn for Christmass Day

Full Text

1 Arise and hail the sacred day,
Cast all low cares of life away,
And thought of meaner things:
This day to cure our deadly woes,
The Son of Righteousness arose,
With healing in his wings.

2 If angels on that happy morn,
The Saviour of the world was born,
Poured forth seraphic songs;
Much more should we of human race,
Adore the wonders of his grace,
To whom the grace belongs.

3 How wonderful, how vast his love,
Who left the shining realms above,
Those happy seats of rest!
How much for lost mankind he bore,
Their peace and pardon to restore,
Can never be expressed.

4 Whilst we adore his boundless grace,
And pious mirth and joy take place
Of sorrow, grief and pain.
Give glory to our God on high,
And not amongst the general joy,
Forget good will to men.

5 O! then let heaven and earth rejoice,
Creation's whole united voice,
And hymn that happy day;
When sin and Satan vanquished fell,
And all the powers of death and hell,
Before his sovereign sway.

Hymns and Spiritual Songs for the use of Christians, 1803

Author: Elizabeth Scott

Scott, Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. Thomas Scott, Independent Minister at Norwich, and sister of Thomas Scott, noted below, was born at Norwich about 1708. In 1751 she was married to Elisha Williams, who had been from 1726 to 1739 Rector of Yale College, U.S.A., and with him she proceeded to Connecticut. On the death of Mr. Williams she was married to the Hon. William Smith, of New York, who also predeceased her. She died at Wethersfield, Connecticut, June 13th, 1776. In connection with Miss Scott's hymns we are acquainted directly and indirectly with four manuscripts, each of which is interesting in itself. These are as follows:— i. The first manuscript is in the library of Yale College, New Haven, Connecticut. Mr. Franklin Bowditch… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Arise, and hail the sacred day
Title: A Hymn for Christmass Day
Author: Elizabeth Scott
Language: English


Arise and hail the happy [sacred] day. [Christmas.] Published anonymously in the Liverpool Liturgy, 1763, p. 155, in 5 stanzas of 6 lines. In 1769 it was given in the Bristol Baptist Collection of Ash & Evans, No. 96, and subsequently in several of the older hymn-books. In modern collections it is sometimes found as, "Arise and hail the sacred day," as in Hall and Lasar's Evangelical Hymnal, N. Y., 1880. The chorus, "O then let heaven and earth rejoice," is not in the original. It appeared in some collections early in the present century. [See Scott, Elizabeth.]

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)