Arise, my tenderest thoughts, arise

Arise, my tenderest thoughts, arise

Author: Philip Doddridge
Published in 106 hymnals

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1 Arise, my tenderest thoughts arise,
To torrents melt my streaming eyes!
And thou my heart with anguish feel,
Those evils which thou canst not heal.

2 See human nature sunk in shame!
See scandal poured on Jesu's name!
The Father wounded through the Son!
The world abused, the soul undone!

3 See the short course of vain delight
Closing in long and dreadful night!
In flames that no abatement know,
The briny tears for ages flow.

4 My God I feel the mournful scene;
My bowels yearn o'er dying men;
And fain my pity would reclaim,
And snatch the fire-brands from the flame.

5 But feeble my compassion proves,
And can but weep where most it loves;
Thine own all saving arm employ,
And turn these drops of grief to joy.

The Christian's duty, exhibited in a series of hymns, 1791

Author: Philip Doddridge

Doddridge, Philip, D.D., was born in London, June 26, 1702. His grandfather was one of the ministers under the Commonwealth, who were ejected in 1662. His father was a London oilman. He was offered by the Duchess of Bedford an University training for ordination in the Church of England, but declined it. He entered Mr. Jennings's non-conformist seminary at Kibworth instead; preached his first sermon at Hinckley, to which Mr. Jennings had removed his academy. In 1723 he was chosen pastor at Kibworth. In 1725 he changed his residence to Market Harborough, still ministering at Kibworth. The settled work of his life as a preceptor and divine began in 1729, with his appointment to the Castle Hill Meeting at Northampton, and continued till in the… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Arise, my tenderest thoughts, arise
Author: Philip Doddridge
Language: English


Arise, my tenderest thoughts, arise. P. Doddridge. [Sorrow because of Sin.] Written, June 10, 1739, on the text, Ps. cxix. 158 ["Doddrige Manuscript"] and first published in J. Orton's edition of Doddridge's Hymns, &c, 1755, unaltered, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines and headed, "Beholding Transgressors with Grief." Also repeated in J. D. Humphreys's edition of Doddridge, 1839. It came into common use at an early date, both in the Church of England and amongst the Nonconformists, and is still retained in numerous collections in Great Britain and America. It is a powerful and strongly worded hymn of the older type, and is suited for use on behalf of missions.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)



The Cyber Hymnal #160
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