Assembled in Thy house of prayer

Assembled in Thy house of prayer

Author: James Montgomery
Published in 1 hymnal

Full Text

Assembled in Thy house of prayer,
On every mind instruction seal;
Preacher and people, Lord, prepare
To seek Thy face, Thy presence feel.

From earthen vessels we receive
The living streams of truth divine;
The spirit with the letter give,
And turn the water into wine.

Enter we now Thy gates with praise,
With reverence at Thine altar bend,
With gladness our thanksgivings raise,
With meekness to Thy Word attend.

So, when the gospel, in Thy name,
From human lips salutes our ear,
May our responding hearts exclaim,
"Speak to us, Lord; Thy servants hear."

Paul then may plant the precious grain,
For Thine will be the quickening power;
Apollos water, not in vain,
For Thou wilt give the genial shower.

The scatter'd seed thus sown in hope
Shall spring and spread with large increase,
And yield on earth a heavenly crop
Of love, joy, righteousness and peace.

Sacred Poems and Hymns

Author: James Montgomery

Montgomery, James, son of John Montgomery, a Moravian minister, was born at Irvine, Ayrshire, Nov. 4, 1771. In 1776 he removed with his parents to the Moravian Settlement at Gracehill, near Ballymena, county of Antrim. Two years after he was sent to the Fulneck Seminary, Yorkshire. He left Fulneck in 1787, and entered a retail shop at Mirfield, near Wakefield. Soon tiring of that he entered upon a similar situation at Wath, near Rotherham, only to find it quite as unsuitable to his taste as the former. A journey to London, with the hope of finding a publisher for his youthful poems ended in failure; and in 1792 he was glad to leave Wath for Shefield to join Mr. Gales, an auctioneer, bookseller, and printer of the Sheffield Register newspap… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Assembled in Thy house of prayer
Author: James Montgomery
Language: English


Assembled in Thy house of prayer. J. Montgomery. [Divine Service.] Written for the Sheffield Sunday School Union, Whitsuntide gathering, 1840, and first printed on a fly-sheet for use at that time. The same year it was sent to Dr. Leifchild, and in 1842 it appeared as No. 31, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, in his collection of Original Hymns, and headed, "For a divine blessing on the ministry of the word." (M. MSS.) In Montgomery's Original Hymns, 1853, it reappeared with the same title as No. 98.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)