Awake, my heart; arise, my tongue

Awake, my heart; arise, my tongue

Author: Isaac Watts
Published in 115 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI, Recording

Full Text

Awake, my heart; arise, my tongue,
Prepare a tuneful voice;
In God, the life of all my joys,
Aloud will I rejoice.

'Tis he adorned my naked soul,
And made salvation mine;
Upon a poor polluted worm
He makes his graces shine.

And lest the shadow of a spot
Should on my soul be found,
He took the robe the Savior wrought,
And cast it all around.

How far the heav'nly robe exceeds
What earthly princes wear
These ornaments, how bright they shine!
How white the garments are!

The Spirit wrought my faith, and love,
And hope, and every grace;
But Jesus spent his life to work
The robe of righteousness.

Strangely, my soul, art thou arrayed
By the great Sacred Three!
In sweetest harmony of praise
Let all thy powers agree.



Source: The Psalms and Hymns of Dr. Watts #156

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Awake, my heart; arise, my tongue
Author: Isaac Watts
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English

Notes

Awake, my heart, arise my tongue. I. Watts. [Spiritual Clothing.] First published in his Hymns and Sacred Songs, 1707 (1709, Bk. i., No. 20), in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, and again in later editions. It is based on Is. lxi. 10. It came into common use at an early date, and is still found in many collections in Great Britain and America.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #148
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
The Psalm-singer's amusement: containing a number of fuging pieces and anthems #78



Advertisements