Blessed Jesus, here we stand

Full Text

1 Dearest Jesus, we are here,
gladly your command obeying.
With this child we now draw near
in response to your own saying
that to you it shall be given
as a child and heir of heaven.

2 Your command is clear and plain,
and we would obey it duly:
"You must all be born again,
heart and life renewing truly,
born of water and the Spirit,
and my kingdom thus inherit."

3 This is why we come to you,
in our arms this infant bearing.
Truly, here your grace we view.
Let this child, your mercy sharing,
in your arms be shielded ever,
yours on earth and yours forever.

4 Gracious Head, your member own;
Shepherd, take your lamb and feed it;
Prince of Peace, make here your throne;
Way of life, to heaven lead it;
precious Vine, let nothing sever
from your side this branch forever.


Source: Glory to God: the Presbyterian Hymnal #483

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth is "the most gifted translator of any foreign sacred lyrics into our tongue, after Dr. Neale and John Wesley; and in practical services rendered, taking quality with quantity, the first of those who have laboured upon German hymns. Our knowledge of them is due to her more largely than to any or all other translators; and by her two series of Lyra Germanica, her Chorale Book, and her Christian Singers of Germany, she has laid all English-speaking Christians under lasting obligation." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872… Go to person page >

Author: Benjamin Schmolck

Schmolck, Benjamin, son of Martin Schmolck, or Schmolcke, Lutheran pastor at Brauchitzchdorf, near Liegnitz in Silesia, was born at Brauchitzchdorf, Dec. 21, 1672. He entered the Gymnasium at Lauban in 1688, and spent five years there. After his return home he preached for his father a sermon which so struck the patron of the living that he made Benjamin an allowance for three years to enable him to study theology. He matriculated, at Michaelmas, 1693, at the University of Leipzig, where he came under the influence of J. Olearius, J. B. Carpzov, and others, and throughout his life retained the character of their teaching, viz. a warm and living practical Christianity, but Churchly in tone and not Pietistic. In the autumn of 1697, after comp… Go to person page >

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The Cyber Hymnal #535
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Instances

Instances (7)TextImageAudioScoreFlexscore
Christian Worship: a Lutheran hymnal #295Text
Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #244Text
Evangelical Lutheran Worship #443Image
Glory to God: the Presbyterian Hymnal #483TextImageAudioFlexscore
Lutheran Service Book #592Text
Presbyterian Hymnal: hymns, psalms, and spiritual songs #493TextImage
Rejoice in the Lord #530Text