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1. Brood o’er us with Thy sheltering wing,
’Neath which our spirits blend
Like brother birds, that soar and sing,
And on the same branch bend.
The arrow that doth wound the dove
Darts not from those who watch and love.

2. If thou the bending reed would break
By thought or word unkind,
Pray that His Spirit you partake,
Who loved and healed mankind:
Seek holy thoughts and heavenly strain,
That make men one in love remain.

3. Learn, too, that wisdom’s rod is given
For faith to kiss, and know;
That greetings glorious from high heaven,
Whence joys supernal flow,
Come from that Love, divinely near,
Which chastens pride and earthborn fear.

4. Through God, who gave that word of might
Which swelled creation’s lay:
Let there be light, and there was light.
What chased the clouds away?
’Twas love whose finger traced aloud
A bow of promise on the cloud.

5. Thou to whose power our hope we give,
Free us from human strife.
Fed by Thy love divine we live,
For Love alone is life;
And life most sweet, as heart to heart
Speaks kindly when we meet and part.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #651

Author: Mary Baker Eddy

Mary Baker Eddy (born Mary Morse Baker, July 16, 1821 – December 3, 1910) is the discoverer and founder of Christian Science, a religious movement that emerged in New England in the late 19th century. Eddy is the author of the movement’s textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (first published in 1875), and founder of The First Church of Christ, Scientist (1892). She also founded The Christian Science Publishing Society (1898). Mary Morse Baker was born in Bow, New Hampshire, the youngest of six children of Abigail and Mark Baker. Raised a Congregationalist, she came to reject teachings such as predestination and original sin, but she loved the biblical accounts of early Christian healing. Mark Baker, Eddy’s fat… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Brood o'er us with thy sheltering wing
Title: Love
Author: Mary Baker Eddy
Language: English




Various forms of GOTTLOB are found in a number of collections of old German melodies. One form of the tune appeared in Johann G. Wagner's Sammlung alter und neuer (1742) with the burial hymn "Gottlob, es geht nunmehr zum Ende" ("Thanks Be to God; My End Is Near Me"). Although only the first line of…

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The Cyber Hymnal #651
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Instances (1 - 3 of 3)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Christian Science Hymnal Supplement: Hymns 430-462 #434
Christian Science Hymnal Supplement: Hymns 430-462 #435
The Cyber Hymnal #651TextScoreAudio
Include 4 pre-1979 instances