Buried beneath the yielding wave

Full Text

1 Buried beneath the yielding wave
The great Redeemer lies;
Faith views Him in the watery grave,
And thence beholds Him rise.

2 Thus do His willing saints, today,
Their ardent zeal express,
And in the Lord’s appointed way,
Fulfill all righteousness.

3 With joy we in His footsteps tread,
And would His cause maintain—
Like Him be numbered with the dead,
And with Him rise and reign.

4 His presence oft revives our hearts,
And drives our fears away;
When He commands, and strength imparts,
We cheerfully obey.

5 Now blest Redeemer, we to Thee
Our grateful voices raise;
Washed in the fountain of Thy blood,
Our lives shall all be praise.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #9674

Author: Benjamin Beddome

Benjamin Beddome was born at Henley-in Arden, Warwickshire, January 23, 1717. His father was a Baptist minister. He studied at various places, and began preaching in 1740. He was pastor of a Baptist society at Bourton-on-the-Water, Gloucestershire, until his death in 1795. In 1770, he received the degree of M.A. from the Baptist College in Providence, Rhode Island. He published several discourses and hymns. "His hymns, to the number of 830, were published in 1818, with a recommendation from Robert Hall." Montgomery speaks of him as a "writer worthy of honour both for the quantity and the quality of his hymns." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872.… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Buried beneath the yielding wave
Author: Benjamin Beddome


Buried beneath the yielding wave. B. Beddome. [Holy Baptism.] Published from Beddome's manuscript in his posthumous Hymns, &c, 1817, No. 603, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, from whence it has passed into numerous collections in Great Britain and America. Original text in Spurgeon's Our Own Hymn Book, No. 925. In some American collections it is dated 1787 in error.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)


DUNDEE (Ravenscroft)

DUNDEE first appeared in the 1615 edition of the Scottish Psalter published in Edinburgh by Andro Hart. Called a "French" tune (thus it also goes by the name of FRENCH), DUNDEE was one of that hymnal's twelve "common tunes"; that is, it was not associated with a specific psalm. In the Psalter Hymnal…

Go to tune page >


Lowell Mason (PHH 96) adapted AZMON from a melody composed by Carl G. Gläser in 1828. Mason published a duple-meter version in his Modern Psalmist (1839) but changed it to triple meter in his later publications. Mason used (often obscure) biblical names for his tune titles; Azmon, a city south of C…

Go to tune page >



The Cyber Hymnal #9674
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)


Instances (1 - 1 of 1)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
The Cyber Hymnal #9674TextScoreAudio
Include 87 pre-1979 instances