Christ, for Thee a wreath adorning

Christ, for Thee a wreath adorning

Translator: John Brownlie; Author: St. Gregory of Nazianzus
Published in 1 hymnal

Full Text

Christ, for Thee a wreath adorning
Weaves my raptured soul with glee,
For from death this glorious morning
Thou hast risen triumphantly.

From the tomb behold Him rising,
Christ our Lord whose praise is sung.
Death is slain; O power surprising!
Hades’ gates are open flung.

Thou for man to earth in meekness
Cam’st that he new born might be;
Thou upon the cross in weakness
Diedst that he might die with Thee.

Thou didst rise—we hail Thee, Jesus!
And we leave the tomb with Thee.
Victor, by the power that frees us,
Where Thou art, there we would be.

Hark! the highest heavens are ringing,
Choirs angelic lead the strain,
And my opened lips in singing
Tell the praises forth again.

Hymns of the Greek Church, 1900

Translator: John Brownlie

Brownlie, John, was born at Glasgow, Aug. 6, 1859, and was educated at Glasgow University, and at the Free Church College in the same city. In 1884 he was licensed by the Presbytery of Glasgow; in 1885 he became Assistant Minister of the Free Church, Portpatrick, and on the death of the Senior Minister in 1890 he entered upon the full charge of the Church there. He has interested himself in educational matters, became a Member of the local School Board in 1888, a governor of Stranraer High School in 1897, and Chairman of the governors in 1901. His hymnological works are:— 1. The Hymns and Hymnwriters of the [Scottish] Church Hymnary, 1899. This is a biographical, historical, and critical companion to that hymnal, and is well done and… Go to person page >

Author: St. Gregory of Nazianzus

Gregory of Nazianzus (St. Gregory Nazianzen), Bishop of Sasima and of Constantinople, son of Gregory, Bishop of Nazianzus in Cappadocia, and Nonna, his wife, was born at a village near that city where his father had an estate, and called Arizanzus. The date of his birth is unknown, but is generally given as A.D. 325. In early childhood he was taught to read the Scriptures by his mother. From his home he passed with his brother Caesarius to a school at Caesarea, the capital of Cappadocia, where he was instructed by one Carterius, supposed by some to be the same as the subsequent head of the monasteries of Antioch, and instructor of St. Chrysostom. At Caesarea he probably met with Basil, with whom he maintained a life-long friendship. From Ca… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Christ, for Thee a wreath adorning
Translator: John Brownlie
Author: St. Gregory of Nazianzus
Meter: 8.7.8.7
Language: English



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