Come, let us join with faithful souls

Full Text

1 Come, let us join with faithful souls
our song of faith to raise;
One family in heart are we,
and one the God we praise.

2 Faithful are all who love the truth
and dare perfect truth proclaim,
Who steadfast stand at God’s right hand
and glorify God's name.

3 And faithful are the gentle hearts
to whom the power is given
Of every hearth to make a home,
of every home a heaven.

4 O God of hosts, our faith renew,
and grant us, in your grace,
To join the songs sung by the saints
in every time and place.

Source: The New Century Hymnal #383

Author: W. G. Tarrant

Tarrant, William George, B.A., b. 1853. Since 1883 Minister of the Wandsworth Unitarian Christian Church. Editor of The Inquirer, 1888-97. One of the editors of the Essex Hall Hymnal. 1890, and of the Revised ed., 1902. 1. Come, let us Join with faithful souls. The Faithful. 2. Draw nigh to God; He will draw nigh to you. The Divine Helper. 3. Long ago the lilies faded. The Constant Presence. 4. The Light along the ages. Easter. 5. With happy voices ringing. Children's Praise. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)  Go to person page >

Author: Ernest W. Shurtleff

Shurtleff, Ernest Warburton, b. at Boston, Mass., April 4, 1862, and educated at Boston Latin School, Harvard University, and Andover Theo. Seminary (1887). Entering the Congregational Ministry, he was Pastor at Palmer and Plymouth, Mass., and is now (1905) Minister of First Church, Minneapolis, Minn. His works include Poems, 1883, Easter Gleams, 1883, and others. His hymn, "Lead on, O King Eternal" (Christian Warfare), was written as a parting hymn to his class of fellow students at Andover, and was included in Hymns of the Faith, Boston, 1887. It has since appeared in several collections. [M. C. Hazard, Ph.D]. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)  Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Come, let us join with faithful souls
Author: W. G. Tarrant
Author: Ernest W. Shurtleff
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

AZMON

Lowell Mason (PHH 96) adapted AZMON from a melody composed by Carl G. Gläser in 1828. Mason published a duple-meter version in his Modern Psalmist (1839) but changed it to triple meter in his later publications. Mason used (often obscure) biblical names for his tune titles; Azmon, a city south of C…

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ELLACOMBE

Published in a chapel hymnal for the Duke of Würtemberg (Gesangbuch der Herzogl, 1784), ELLACOMBE (the name of a village in Devonshire, England) was first set to the words "Ave Maria, klarer und lichter Morgenstern." During the first half of the nineteenth century various German hymnals altered the…

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ST. PAUL (Chalmers' Collection)


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #1000
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 3 of 3)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Hymns for a Pilgrim People: a congregational hymnal #360
The Cyber Hymnal #1000TextScoreAudio
The New Century Hymnal #383Text
Include 48 pre-1979 instances



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