Come, Let Us Use the Grace Divine

Full Text

1 Come, let us use the grace divine,
And all with one accord,
In a perpetual covenant join
Ourselves to Christ the Lord.

2 Give up ourselves through Jesu's power,
His name to glorify;
And promise in this sacred hour,
For God to live and die.

3 The covenant we this moment make
Be ever kept in mind;
We will no more our God forsake,
Or cast these words behind.

4 We never will throw off the fear.
Who hears our solemn vow;
And if thou art well pleased to hear,
Come down and meet us now!

5 Thee, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost,
let all our hearts receive;
Present with the celestial host,
The peaceful answer give.

6 To each covenant the blood apply
Which takes our sins away;
And register our names on high,
And keep us to that day.

A Selection of Hymns, from Various Authors, Supplementary for the use of Christians. 1st Ed., 1816

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Notes

Come, let us use the grace divine. C. Wesley. [Confirmation.] First published in his Short Hymns, &c, 1762, vol. ii., No. 1242, in 3 stanzas of 8 lines, and based upon Jer. 1. 5 (Poetical Works, 1868-72, vol. x. p. 40). In 1780 it was included in the Wesleyan Hymn Book, No. 518, from whence it has passed into other collections of the Methodist bodies. It was also given by Montgomery in his Christian Psalmist, 1825, and is found in some Nonconformist collections. The form in which it is usually given in the Church of England hymnals appeared in Bickersteth's Christian Psalmody, 1833, as, “Come, let us seek the grace of God," as in Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory, 1872

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

DUNDEE (Ravenscroft)

DUNDEE first appeared in the 1615 edition of the Scottish Psalter published in Edinburgh by Andro Hart. Called a "French" tune (thus it also goes by the name of FRENCH), DUNDEE was one of that hymnal's twelve "common tunes"; that is, it was not associated with a specific psalm. In the Psalter Hymnal…

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KINGSFOLD

Thought by some scholars to date back to the Middle Ages, KINGSFOLD is a folk tune set to a variety of texts in England and Ireland. The tune was published in English Country Songs (1893), an anthology compiled by Lucy E. Broadwood and J. A. Fuller Maitland. After having heard the tune in Kingsfold,…

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CONWAY


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The United Methodist Hymnal #606

Instances

Instances (1 - 5 of 5)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Hymns and Psalms: a Methodist and ecumenical hymn book #649
Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #128
Singing the Faith #549
The Cyber Hymnal #1039TextScoreAudio
The United Methodist Hymnal #606TextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Include 129 pre-1979 instances



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