Come, my soul, thou must be waking

Come, my soul, thou must be waking

Translator: H. J. B.; Author: Friedrich von Canitz (1700)
Published in 214 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI, Recording

Full Text

Come, my soul, thou must be waking;
Now is breaking Over the earth another day;
Come to him who made this splendor;
See thou render All thy feeble strength can pay.

Gladly hail the sun returning;
Ready burning Be the incense of thy powers;
For the night is safely ended;
God hath tended With his care thy helpless hours.

Pray that he may prosper ever
Each endeavor, When thine aim is good and true;
But that he may ever thwart thee,
And convert thee, When thou evil wouldst pursue.

Only God's free gifts abuse not,
Light refuse not, But this Spirit's voice obey;
Thou with him shalt dwell, beholding
Light enfolding All things in unclouded day.

Source: Worship in Song: A Friends Hymnal #31

Translator: H. J. B.

Buckoll, Henry James, M.A., son of the Rev. James Buckoll, Rector of Siddington, near Cirencester, Gloucester; born at Siddington, Sept. 9,1803. He was educated at Rugby and Queen's College, Oxford, graduating B.A.in 1826, and became Assistant Master at Rugby the same year. He took Holy Orders in 1827, and died at Rugby June 6, 1871. He was probably the editor of the first edition of the Rugby School Collection. In 1839 he edited a Collection of Hymns for the Rugby Parish Church, and in 1850 compiled, with Dr. Goulburn, a new edition of the Collection for the Rugby School Chapel. That collection contains 14 of his hymns, a few of which were translations from the Latin and German. His Hymns translated from the German were published 1842. I… Go to person page >

Author: Friedrich von Canitz

Friedrich Rudolph Ludwig von Canitz, German poet and diplomant, was born at Berlin, November 27, 1654. He studied at the universities of Leyden and of Leipzig. After extensive travels in Europe, he was appointed groom of the bedchamber to the elector Frederick William of Brandenburg. In 1680, he became councilor of legation, then privy councilor, and was finally created a baron of the empire. He died in Berlin on August 11, 1699. His poems, which did not appear until after his death, are for the most part dry and stilted, based upon Latin and Greek models, but they were, nevertheless, a healthy influence and counterbalance to the coarseness of contemporary poetry. The spiritual poems, 24 in number, are his best work. They were first… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Come, my soul, thou must be waking
German Title: Seele du musst munter werden
Author: Friedrich von Canitz (1700)
Translator: H. J. B.
Meter: 8.4.7.8.4.7
Language: English

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #1008
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
The Hymnal, Revised and Enlarged, as adopted by the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in the year of our Lord 1892 #3a
The Hymnal, Revised and Enlarged, as adopted by the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in the year of our Lord 1892 #3c
  • Columbia College (XML)
The Hymnal, Revised and Enlarged, as adopted by the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in the year of our Lord 1892 #3b

Instances

Instances (1 - 6 of 6)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Small Church Music #1394Audio
Small Church Music #2561Audio
Small Church Music #3205Audio
The Cyber Hymnal #1008TextScoreAudio
Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) #396TextPage Scan
Worship in Song: A Friends Hymnal #31TextAudio
Include 208 pre-1979 instances



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