Come,Thou Savior of our race, Choicest Gift of heavenly grace

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1 Come, Thou Saviour of our race,
Choicest Gift of heav'nly grace!
O Thou blessed Virgin's Son,
Be Thy race on earth begun,
Be Thy race on earth begun.

2 Not of mortal blood or birth,
He descends from heaven to earth:
By the Holy Ghost conceived,
God and man by us believed,
God and man by us believed.

3 Wondrous birth! O wondrous Child
Of the virgin undefiled!
Though by all the world disowned,
Still to be in heaven enthroned,
Still to be in heaven enthroned.

4 From the Father forth He came,
And returneth to the same;
Captive leading death and hell,--
High the song of triumph swell!
High the song of triumph swell!

5 Equal to the Father now,
Though to dust Thou once didst bow,
Boundless shall Thy kingdom be;
When shall we its glories see?
When shall we its glories see?

6 Brightly doth Thy manger shine!
Glorious in its light divine:
Let not sin o'ercloud this light,
Ever be our faith thus bright,
Ever be our faith thus bright.


Source: The Hymnal and Order of Service #23

Author: St. Ambrose

Ambrosius (St. Ambrose), second son and third child of Ambrosius, Prefect of the Gauls, was born at Lyons, Aries, or Treves--probably the last--in 340 A.D. On the death of his father in 353 his mother removed to Rome with her three children. Ambrose went through the usual course of education, attaining considerable proficiency in Greek; and then entered the profession which his elder brother Satyrus had chosen, that of the law. In this he so distinguished himself that, after practising in the court of Probus, the Praetorian Prefect of Italy, he was, in 374, appointed Consular of Liguria and Aemilia. This office necessitated his residence in Milan. Not many months after, Auxentius, bishop of Milan, who had joined the Arian party, died; and m… Go to person page >

Translator (into German): Martin Luther

Luther, Martin, born at Eisleben, Nov. 10, 1483; entered the University of Erfurt, 1501 (B.A. 1502, M.A.. 1503); became an Augustinian monk, 1505; ordained priest, 1507; appointed Professor at the University of Wittenberg, 1508, and in 1512 D.D.; published his 95 Theses, 1517; and burnt the Papal Bull which had condemned them, 1520; attended the Diet of Worms, 1521; translated the Bible into German, 1521-34; and died at Eisleben, Feb. 18, 1546. The details of his life and of his work as a reformer are accessible to English readers in a great variety of forms. Luther had a huge influence on German hymnody. i. Hymn Books. 1. Ellich cristlich lider Lobgesang un Psalm. Wittenberg, 1524. [Hamburg Library.] This contains 8 German h… Go to person page >

Translator (into English): William M. Reynolds

Born: March 4, 1812, Fay­ette Coun­ty, Penn­syl­van­ia. Died: Sep­tem­ber 5, 1876, Oak Park, Il­li­nois. Reynolds was ed­u­cat­ed at Jef­fer­son Coll­ege, Ca­non­sburg, Penn­syl­van­ia, and Luth­er­an Get­tys­burg Sem­in­ary. He was a pro­fes­sor at Penn­syl­van­ia Coll­ege (1833-50); pres­i­dent of Cap­i­tal Un­i­ver­si­ty, Co­lum­bus, Ohio (1850-53); and pres­i­dent of Il­li­nois State Un­i­ver­si­ty (1857-60). He be­came an or­dained Epis­co­pal min­is­ter in 1864, and found­ed the Evan­gel­i­cal Re­view. His last pas­tor­ate was at Christ Church, Har­lem (Oak Park), Il­li­nois, from 1872 un­til his death. Lyrics-- Come, Thou Sav­ior of Our Race Come, Th… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Come,Thou Savior of our race, Choicest Gift of heavenly grace
German Title: Nun komm, der heiden Heiland
Translator (into English): William M. Reynolds (1850)
Author: St. Ambrose
Translator (into German): Martin Luther (1524)
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain



HENDON was composed by Henri A. Cesar Malan (b. Geneva, Switzerland, 1787; d. Vandoeuvres, Switzerland, 1864) and included in a series of his own hymn texts and tunes that he began to publish in France in 1823, and which ultimately became his great hymnal Chants de Sion (1841). HENDON is thought to…

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NUN KOMM DER HEIDEN HEILAND is a chorale derived from a chant. Among the simplest of the Lutheran repertoire, it is framed by identical lines–l and 4. Sing the entire hymn with antiphonal groups (the practice its original Latin author, Ambrose, strongly promoted). Sing some stanzas in unison and o…

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The Cyber Hymnal #1125
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