"Come unto Me, ye weary"

Full Text

1 "Come unto Me, ye weary,
And I will give you rest."
O blessed voice of Jesus,
Which comes to hearts oppressed!
It tells of benediction,
Of pardon, grace, and peace,
Of joy that hath no ending,
Of love that cannot cease.

2 "Come unto Me, ye wand'rers,
And I will give you light."
0 loving voice of Jesus,
Which comes to cheer the night!
Our hearts were filled with sadness,
And we had lost our way;
But Thou hast brought us gladness
And songs at break of day.

3 "Come unto Me, ye fainting,
And I will give you life."
0 cheering voice of Jesus,
Which comes to aid our strife!
The foe is stern and eager,
The fight is fierce and long;
But Thou hast made us mighty
And stronger than the strong.

4 "And whosoever cometh,
I will not cast him out."
O patient love of Jesus,
Which drives away our doubt,
Which, though we be unworthy
Of love so great and free,
Invites us very sinners
To come, dear Lord, to Thee!

Source: Lutheran Service Book #684

Author: W. Chatterton Dix

Dix, William Chatterton, son of John Dix, surgeon, of Bristol, author of the Life of Chatterton; Local Legends, &c, born at Bristol, June 14, 1837, and educated at the Grammar School of that city. Mr. Chatterton Dix's contributions to modern hymnody are numerous and of value. His fine Epiphany hymn, "As with gladness men of old,” and his plaintive ”Come unto Me, ye weary," are examples of his compositions, many of which rank high amongst modern hymns. In his Hymns of Love and Joy, 1861, Altar Songs, Verses on the Holy Eucharist, 1867; Vision of All Saints, &c, 1871; and Seekers of a City, 1878, some of his compositions were first published. The greater part, however, were contributed to Hymns Ancient & Modern; St. Raphaels Hymnbook, 186… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: "Come unto Me, ye weary, And I will give thee rest."
Title: "Come unto Me, ye weary"
Author: W. Chatterton Dix (1867)
Meter: D
Language: English
Publication Date: 1892
Copyright: Public Domain


Come unto Me, ye weary. W. G. Dix. [Invitation.] This hymn, which ranks as one of the best of Mr. Dix's efforts, was published in 1867 in the People's Hymnal; in 1869, in the Appendix to the Society for Promoting Christian Education Psalms & Hymns; in 1871, in Church Hymns; in 1875, in Hymns Ancient & Modern, and in other collections. It has also been reprinted in Laudes Domini, N. Y., 1884.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)



Instances (1 - 12 of 12)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Ambassador Hymnal: for Lutheran worship #424
Christian Worship: a Lutheran hymnal #336Text
Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #413TextPage Scan
Lutheran Service Book #684TextPage Scan
Lutheran Worship #345Text
Small Church Music #1276Audio
Small Church Music #2090Audio
Small Church Music #2583Audio
Small Church Music #5588Audio
The Cyber Hymnal #1006TextScoreAudio
The New Century Hymnal #484
Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) #482TextPage Scan
Include 139 pre-1979 instances