Daily, daily sing the praises

Daily, daily sing the praises

Author: Sabine Baring-Gould (1865)
Published in 52 hymnals

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1 Daily, daily sing the praises
Of the city God hath made;
In the beauteous fields of Eden
Its foundation-stones are laid.
O that I had wings of angels,
Here to spread, and heaven-ward fly!
I would seek the gates of Zion,
Far beyond the starry sky.

2 All the walls of that dear city
Are of bright and burnished gold:
It is matchless in its beauty,
And its treasures are untold.
O that I had wings of angels,
Here to spread, and heaven-ward fly!
I would seek the gates of Zion,
Far beyond the starry sky.

3 In the midst of that dear city
Christ is reigning on His seat.
And the angels swing their censers
In a ring about His feet.
O that I had wings of angels,
Here to spread, and heaven-ward fly!
I would seek the gates of Zion,
Far beyond the starry sky.

4 From the throne a river issues,
Clear as crystal, passing bright,
And it traverses the city
Like a sudden beam of light.
O that I had wings of angels,
Here to spread, and heaven-ward fly!
I would seek the gates of Zion,
Far beyond the starry sky.

5 There the meadows green and dewy
Shine with lilies wondrous fair:
Thousand, thousand are the colors
Of the waving flowers there.
O that I had wings of angels,
Here to spread, and heaven-ward fly!
I would seek the gates of Zion,
Far beyond the starry sky.

6 There the wind is sweetly fragrant,
And is laden with the song
Of the seraphs, and the elders,
And the great redeemèd throng.
O that I had wings of angels,
Here to spread, and heaven-ward fly!
I would seek the gates of Zion,
Far beyond the starry sky.

7 O I would my ears were open
Here to catch that happy strain!
O I would my eyes some vision
Of that Eden could attain!
O that I had wings of angels,
Here to spread, and heaven-ward fly!
I would seek the gates of Zion,
Far beyond the starry sky.

Amen.

The Hymnal: Published by the authority of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., 1895

Author: Sabine Baring-Gould

Baring-Gould, Sabine, M.A., eldest son of Mr. Edward Baring-Gould, of Lew Trenchard, Devon, b. at Exeter, Jan. 28, 1834, and educated at Clare College, Cambridge, B.A. 1857, M.A. 1860. Taking Holy Orders in 1864, he held the curacy of Horbury, near Wakefield, until 1807, when he was preferred to the incumbency of Dalton, Yorks. In 1871 he became rector of East Mersea, Essex, and in 1881 rector of Lew Trenchard, Devon. His works are numerous, the most important of which are, Lives of the Saints, 15 vols., 1872-77; Curious Myths of the Middle Ages, 2 series, 1866-68; The Origin and Development of Religious Belief, 2 vols., 1869-1870; and various volumes of sermons. His hymns, original and translated, appeared in the Church Times; Hymns Ancien… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Daily, daily sing the praises
Author: Sabine Baring-Gould (1865)
Meter: 8.7.8.7 D
Language: English
Refrain First Line: O, that I had wings of angels

Notes

Daily, daily sing the praises. S. Baring-Gould. [Processional .] This popular processional was written in 1865, and printed on a card for St. John's Mission, Horbury Bridge, Yorkshire. It was again printed in the Church Times , 1865, and subsequently included in the People's Hymnal, 1867, and other collections. Its use has also extended to some of the American hymn-books. In connection with the Uganda mission a short time before the murder of Bishop Hannington, the following touching circumstance is recorded in the Rock, Sept. 18, 1885, as having taken place in January, 1885. Two native lads who had been kidnapped, but subsequently released, reported—

”That they had been taken with Kakumba and Ashe's boy, as also Serwanga, a tall, fine fellow, a baptised lad whom Majasi [the leader of the hostile party] had caught, and Duta's wife Sarah and her child, to a place outside the capital. That Serwanga, Kakumba, and Ashe's boy had been tortured by having their arms cut off, and were then bound alive to a scaffolding, under which a fire was made, and they were slowly burnt to death. Majasi and his men mocked them, and bade them pray now if Isa Masiya [Jesus Christ] would rescue them from his hands. The dear lads clung to their faith, and in the fire they sang, Killa siku tunsifu (the hymn, ‘Daily, daily sing the praises’)."

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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