Do not I love thee, O my Lord?

Full Text

1 Do not I love Thee, O my Lord?
Behold my heart and see;
And cast each idol from its throne,
That dares to rival Thee.

2 Is not Thy Name melodious still
To my attentive ear?
Doth not each pulse with pleasure bound,
My Saviour's voice to hear?

3 Hast Thou a lamb in all Thy flock
I would disdain to feed?
Hast Thou a foe, before whose face
I fear Thy cause to plead?

4 Thou know'st I love Thee, dearest Lord;
But O, I long to soar
Far from the sphere of mortal joys,
That I may love Thee more.

Source: Church Book: for the use of Evangelical Lutheran congregations #535

Author: Philip Doddridge

Doddridge, Philip, D.D., was born in London, June 26, 1702. His grandfather was one of the ministers under the Commonwealth, who were ejected in 1662. His father was a London oilman. He was offered by the Duchess of Bedford an University training for ordination in the Church of England, but declined it. He entered Mr. Jennings's non-conformist seminary at Kibworth instead; preached his first sermon at Hinckley, to which Mr. Jennings had removed his academy. In 1723 he was chosen pastor at Kibworth. In 1725 he changed his residence to Market Harborough, still ministering at Kibworth. The settled work of his life as a preceptor and divine began in 1729, with his appointment to the Castle Hill Meeting at Northampton, and continued till in the… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Do not I love thee, O my Lord?
Author: Philip Doddridge
Language: English


Do not I love Thee, O my Lord? P. Doddridge. [St. Peter's love of Christ.] This hymn is not in the D. MSS. It was first published in J. Orton's posthumous edition of Doddridge's Hymns, &c, 1755, No. 246, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines and headed, “Appeal to Christ for the sincerity of Love to Him." It is based on St. Peter's answer to Christ, "Lord, Thou knowest all things, Thou knowest that I love Thee." In 1839 it was repeated in J. D. Humphreys's edition of Doddridge's Hymns, &c. Its use in America is extensive.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)



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