All Things New

Full Text

Earth and heaven repeat the cry,
"Glory be to God on high."

Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth;
for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away,
and the sea was no more.
And I saw the holy city, the new Jerusalem,
coming down out of heaven from God.
And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying,
"See, the home of God is among mortals.
The Lord will dwell with them;
they will be God's peoples,
and God personally will be with them;
God will wipe every tear from their eyes.
Death will be no more;
mourning and crying and pain will be no more,
for the first things have passed away." R

And the one who was seated on the throne said,
"See, I am making all things new."
Also the enthroned one said,
"Write this, for these words are trustworthy and true."
Then the Lord said to me, "It is done!
I am the Alpha and the Omega,
the beginning and the end.
To the thirsty I will give water as a gift
from the spring of the water of life.
Those who conquer will inherit these things,
and I will be their God
and they will be my children. R

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Earth and heaven repeat the cry
Title: All Things New
Author: Charles Wesley
Refrain First Line: Earth and heaven repeat the cry



LLANFAIR is usually attributed to Welsh singer Robert Williams (b. Mynydd Ithel, Anglesey, Wales, 1781; d. Mynydd Ithel, 1821), whose manuscript, dated July 14, 1817, included the tune. Williams lived on the island of Anglesey. A basket weaver with great innate musical ability, Williams, who was bli…

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