Far from my thoughts, vain world, begone

Far from my thoughts, vain world, begone

Author: Isaac Watts
Published in 334 hymnals

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Full Text

1 Far from my thoughts, vain world, begone;
Let my religious hours alone;
From flesh and sense I would be free,
And hold communion, Lord, with Thee.

2 My heart grows warm with holy fire,
And kindles with a pure desire
To see Thy grace, to taste Thy love,
And feel Thine influence from above.

3 When I can say that God is mine,
When I can see Thy glories shine,
I'll tread the world beneath my feet,
And all that men call rich and great.

4 Send comfort down from Thy right hand,
To cheer me in this barren land;
And in thy temple let me know
The joys that from Thy presence flow.



Source: Hymnal: according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America #161

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Far from my thoughts, vain world, begone
Author: Isaac Watts
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Language: English
Refrain First Line: I'll never turn back any more

Notes

Far from my thoughts, vain world, begone. I. Watts. [Holy Communion.] This hymn was given in his Hymns & Sacred Songs, 1707: and again in 1709 (Book ii., Nos. 15,16), in two parts, each part consisting of 6 stanzas of 4 lines, and the second beginning, "Lord, what a heav'n of saving grace." Pt. i. was given with alterations and the omission of stanzas iii., iv. in G. Whitefield's Collection, 1753, No. 2, thereby rendering it a most suitable hymn for the opening of Divine Service. This use of the hymn is still followed, especially in America, as in Dr. Hatfield's Church Hymn Book, 1872, &c. In the American Church Pastorals, Boston, 1864, No. 710, stanzas v., vi. are given as "Blest Jesus! what delicious fare!" Pt. ii. is also somewhat extensively used in Great Britain and America.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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Media

The Cyber Hymnal #1514
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