Give thanks, my soul, for harvest

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Source: Voices United: The Hymn and Worship Book of The United Church of Canada #522
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Author: William Watkins Reid

Reid, William Watkins, Sr. (Ballinasloe, County Galway, Ireland, October 15, 1890--February 18, 1983, Jenkins Township, Pennsylvania). Methodist. Parents were William Reid, a native of Moneymore, near Belfast, and Sarah Watkins of Londonderry. Came to the United States in 1900. Attended New York University (bachelor's degree, 1915; master's degree in journalism, 1917). Served The Hymn Society as President, Executive Director, and Editor of The Hymn from 1966 to 1976. Authored the Hymn Society's 40th anniversary history, Sing with Spirit and Understanding. Also edited The Pastor's Journal for the Methodist church and worked as its director of the News Service of the Board of Missions. Also: Caulfield, Benjamin. --From DNAH Archives… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Give thanks, my soul, for harvest
Author: William Watkins Reid
Meter: D
Publication Date: 1961
Copyright: Copyright 1961 by the Hymn Society of America


MUNICH (Mendelssohn)

MUNICH has a colorful history. Traces of it run as far back as 1593 in the Dresden, Germany, Gesangbuch in conjunction with the text 'Wir Christenleut." A version from a Meiningen Gesangbuch (1693) is still used in Lutheranism for "O Gott, du frommer Gott." Felix Mendelssohn's adaptation of that tun…

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GREENLAND, an example of the popular nineteenth-century practice of creating hymn tunes from the works of classical composers, is thought to be originally from one of J. Michael Haydn's (PHH 67) "Deutschen Kirchen Messen." The tune acquired its title from its occasional association with the text "Fr…

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