God of grace, O let thy light

God of grace, O let thy light

Author: Edward Churton
Published in 10 hymnals

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1. God of grace, O let Thy light
Bless our dim and blinded sight;
Like the day-spring on the night,
Bid Thy grace to shine.

2. To the nations led astray
Thine eternal love display:
Let Thy truth direct their way
Till the world be Thine.

3. Praise to Thee, the faithful Lord;
Let all tongues in glad accord
Learn the good thanksgiving word,
Ever praising Thee.

4. Let them moved to gladness sing,
Owning Thee their Judge and King;
Righteous truth shall bloom and spring
Where Thy rule shall be.

5. Praise to Thee, all faithful Lord;
Let all tongues in glad accord
Speak the good thanksgiving word,
Heart rejoicing praise.

6. So the fruitful earth’s increase,
Bounty of the God of peace,
Never in its course shall cease
Through the length of days;

7. While His grace our life shall cheer,
Furthest lands shall own His fear,
Brought to Him in worship near,
Taught His mercy’s ways.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #1921

Author: Edward Churton

Churton, Edward, D.D., son of the Ven. Ralph Churton, sometime Archdeacon of St. David's and Hector of Middleton Cheney, Northampton, was born in 1800, and educated at the Charterhouse and Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated in honours, in 1821. He was for some time one of the Masters at Charterhouse. He took Holy Orders in 1826; was the first Head Master of the Hackney Church of England School, 1830; Rector of Crayke, 1835; Prebendary in York Cathedral, 1841; and Archdeacon of Cleveland, 1846. He died July 4, 1874. Archdeacon Churton's works include: (1) The Early English Church, 1840. (2) Memoir of Bishop Pearson, 1844. (3) Lays of Faith and Royalty, 18-15. (4) Memoir of Joshua Watson, 1861. He also edited several works, including… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: God of grace, O let thy light
Author: Edward Churton


God of grace, O let Thy light. E. Churton. [Psalm lxvii.] Written in 1854, and published in the same year in his Cleveland Psalter, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. In 1861 it was given unaltered in Hymns Ancient & Modern, and repeated in the revised edition 1875. It is also in the Hymnary, 1872, and other English collections, and a few of the American hymn-books. It is a favourable specimen of the author's style.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)



The Cyber Hymnal #1921
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