Hail, thou God of grace and glory

Hail, thou God of grace and glory

Author: Thomas William Baxter Aveling
Published in 33 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, Noteworthy Composer
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1 Hail! Thou God of grace and glory!
Who Thy name hast magnified,
By redemption’s wondrous story,
By the Saviour crucified;
Thanks to Thee for ev’ry blessing,
Flowing from the Fount of love;
Thanks for present good unceasing,
And for hopes of bliss above.

2 Hear us, as thus bending lowly,
Near Thy bright and burning throne;
We invoke Thee, God most holy!
Thro’ Thy well-beloved Son;
Send the baptism of Thy Spirit,
Shed the pentecostal fire;
Let us all Thy grace inherit,
Waken, crown each good desire.

3 Bind Thy people, Lord! in union,
With the seven-fold cord of love;
Breathe a spirit of communion
With the glorious hosts above;
Let Thy work be seen progressing;
Bow each heart, and bend each knee;
Till the world, Thy truth possessing,
Celebrates its jubilee.

Source: Gloria Deo: a Collection of Hymns and Tunes for Public Worship in all Departments of the Church #619

Author: Thomas William Baxter Aveling

Aveling, Thomas William Baxter, D.D., born Castletown, Isle of Man, May 11, 1815, educated privately and at Highbury College for the Congregational Ministry, and ordained to the pastorate of Kingsland in 1838, died at Reedham, July 3, 1884. In 1875 he received the degree of D.D. from the Howard University, United States. His published works include The Irish Scholar, a Narrative, 1841; Naaman, or Life's Shadows and Sunshine, 1853 ; Voices of Many Waters, &c, 1855; The Service of the Sanctuary, &c, 1859, including contributions to periodicals. Dr. Aveling was sometime editor of The Jewish Herald. In 1834 he published a small volume of poems and hymns. Those of his hymns which have come into common use were mostly written from year to year to… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Hail, thou God of grace and glory
Author: Thomas William Baxter Aveling
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

Hail, Thou God of grace and glory. T. W. Aveling. [Prosperity of the Church desired.] "One of four hymns sung on the occasion of the jubilee of the Old Congregational Chapel, Kingsland, which was held on June 16, 1844." (Miller's Singers & Song, 1869, p. 531.) It was given in the New Congregational Hymn Book, 1859, No. 816, in 3 stanzas of 8 lines. It has passed into several American collections, including Hatfield's Church Hymn Book, 1872, No. 1201; the Laudes Domini, 1884, No. 947, for "Christian Union"; and others.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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