Hark! ten thousand harps and voices

Full Text

1 Hark! ten thousand harps and voices
Sound the note of praise above;
Jesus reigns and heav'n rejoices,
Jesus reigns, the God of love.
See, He sits on yonder throne;
Jesus rules the world alone.

Refrain:
Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia! Amen.

2 Sing how Jesus came from heaven,
How He bore the cross below,
How all pow'r to Him is given,
How He reigns in glory now.
'Tis a great and endless theme--
O, 'tis sweet to sing of Him. (Refrain)

3 Jesus, hail! Thy glory brightns
All above and gives it worth;
Lor of life, thy smile enlightens,
Cheers and charms Thy saints on earth.
When we think of love like Thine,
Lord, we own it love divine. (Refrain)

4 King of glory, reign forever!
Thine an everlasting crown.
Nothing from Thy love shall sever
Those who Thou hast made Thine own:
Happy objects of Thy grace,
Destined to behold Thy face. (Refrain)

5 Savior, hasten Thine appearing;
Bring, O bring the glorious day,
When, the awful summons hearing,
Heav'n and earth shall pass away.
Then, with golden harps, we'll sing,
"Glory, glory,to our King!" (Refrain)



Source: Hymns for the Living Church #172

Author: Thomas Kelly

Kelly, Thomas, B.A., son of Thomas Kelly, a Judge of the Irish Court of Common Pleas, was born in Dublin, July 13, 1769, and educated at Trinity College, Dublin. He was designed for the Bar, and entered the Temple, London, with that intention; but having undergone a very marked spiritual change he took Holy Orders in 1792. His earnest evangelical preaching in Dublin led Archbishop Fowler to inhibit him and his companion preacher, Rowland Hill, from preaching in the city. For some time he preached in two unconsecrated buildings in Dublin, Plunket Street, and the Bethesda, and then, having seceded from the Established Church, he erected places of worship at Athy, Portarlington, Wexford, &c, in which he conducted divine worship and preached. H… Go to person page >

Notes

Hark, ten thousand harps and voices. T. Kelly. [Praise to Jesus.] First published in his Hymns, &c, 2nd edition, 1806, in 7 stanzas of 6 lines, and headed with the text "Let all the angels of God worship Him." In 1812 it was included in his Hymns adapted for Social Worship, No. 7, but subsequently it was restored to the original work (edition 1853, No. 42). Its use is mainly confined to America, where it is given in several collections, including Songs for the Sanctuary, 1865, &c. In most cases it is abbreviated.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

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Ambassador Hymnal: for Lutheran worship #119
Seventh-day Adventist Hymnal #222
Small Church Music #2125Audio
The Cyber Hymnal #2164TextScoreAudio
Include 600 pre-1979 instances



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