How do thy mercies close me round?

How do thy mercies close me round?

Author: Charles Wesley
Published in 102 hymnals

Audio files: Recording

Full Text

1 How do Thy mercies close me round!
For ever be Thy name adored;
I blush in all things to abound;
The servant is above his Lord!

2 Inured to poverty and pain,
A suff'ring life my Master led:
The Son of God, the Son of man,
He had not where to lay His head.

3 But lo! a place He hath prepared
For me, whom watchful angels keep;
Yea, He himself becomes my guard;
He smooths my bed and gives me sleep.

4 Jesus protects; my fears, begone:
What can the Rock of Ages move?
Safe in Thine arms I lay me down,
Thine everlasting arms of love.

5 I rest beneath th'Almighty's shade,
My griefs expire, my troubles cease;
Thou, Lord, on whom my soul is stay'd,
Wilt keep me still in perfect peace.

6 Me for Thine own Thou lov'st to take
In time and in eternity;
Thou never, never wilt forsake
A helpless worm that trusts in Thee.

Source: Book of Worship (Rev. ed.) #448

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: How do thy mercies close me round?
Author: Charles Wesley

Tune

FEDERAL STREET

Henry Kemble Oliver (b. Beverly, MA, 1800; d. Salem, MA, 1885) composed FEDERAL STREET in 1832, possibly as an imitation of earlier psalm tunes in long meter. He took it to a music class taught by Lowell Mason (who may have contributed to the harmony); Mason (PHH 96) published it in his Boston Acade…

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