Jesus Loves Even Me

Full Text

I am so glad that our Father in heav'n
tells of his love in the book he has giv'n:
wonderful things in the Bible I see--
this is the dearest, that Jesus loves me.

Refrain:
I am so glad that Jesus loves me,
Jesus loves me, Jesus loves me;
I am so glad that Jesus loves me,
Jesus loves even me.



Source: Sing With Me #203

Author (attributed to): Emily S. Oakey

(no biographical information available about Emily S. Oakey.) Go to person page >

Author: P. P. Bliss

Bliss, Philip, b. at Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, July 9, 1838. In 1864 he went to Chicago in the employ of Dr. George F. Root, the musician, where he was engaged in conducting musical Institutes, and in composing Sunday School melodies. Originally a Methodist, he became, about 1871, a choirman of the First Congregational Church, Chicago, and the Superintendent of its Sunday Schools. In 1874 he joined D. W. Whittle in evangelical work. To this cause he gave (although a poor man) the royalty of his Gospel Songs, which was worth some thirty thousand dollars. His death was sudden. It occurred in the railway disaster at Ashtabula, Ohio, Dec. 30, 1876. He had escaped from the car, but lost his life in trying to save his wife. His hymns are n… Go to person page >

Text Information

Notes

Two hymns,"I am so glad that our Father in heaven," and "Sowing the seed by the daylight [dawnlight] fair," (sometimes given as "Sowing our seed in the morning fair") are usually attributed to Mr. Bliss. In his Gospel Songs, Cincinnati, 1874, however, he lays claim to the music only. Mr. Sankey attributes this last to " E. A. Oakey." With the exception of No. 48, these hymns are given in Mr. Sankey's Sacred Songs & Solos, Pts. i. and ii. Their popularity is far beyond their literary merits, and is mainly due to the simple melodies to which they are wedded. As a writer of hymns of this class Mr. Bliss is second only to Mrs. Van Alstyne. Many anecdotes concerning hymns of this class are given in American Evangelists; an Account of their work in England and America, by the Rev. Elias Nason, Boston, U.S., Lathrop & Co., 1877.
Mr. Bliss is usually known as "P. P. Bliss." This is found on the title-pages of his collections. On his own authority, however, we are enabled to say that his name originally stood thus: “Philipp Bliss.” Early in life he separated the final p from his Christian name, constituted it a capital P, and thus produced "P. P. Bliss." (For this article we are mainly indebted to Professor F. M. Bird, and Mr. H. P. Main.)

-John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #3359
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
Timeless Truths #527

Instances

Instances (1 - 18 of 18)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Ambassador Hymnal: for Lutheran worship #531
Hymns for a Pilgrim People: a congregational hymnal #464
Hymns of Faith #243TextPage Scan
Praise! Our Songs and Hymns #542Page Scan
Rejoice Hymns #689
Sing Joyfully #336TextPage Scan
Sing With Me #203Text
Small Church Music #440Audio
Soul-stirring Songs & Hymns (Rev. ed.) #178
The Celebration Hymnal: songs and hymns for worship #495TextPage Scan
The Christian Life Hymnal #275
The Covenant Hymnal: a worshipbook #444
The Cyber Hymnal #3359TextScoreAudio
The Hymnal for Worship and Celebration #357TextPage Scan
The New National Baptist Hymnal #456
Timeless Truths #527TextScore
Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) #191TextPage Scan
生命聖詩 - Hymns of Life, 1986 #518
Include 314 pre-1979 instances



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