Jesu geh voran

Full Text

1 Jesus, geh voran
auf der Lebensbahn;
und wir wollen nicht verweilen,
Dir getreulich nachzueilen,
führ uns an der Hand
bis ins Vaterland.

2 Soll's uns hart ergehn
laß uns feste stehn,
und auch in den schwersten Tagen
niemals über Lasten klagen;
denn durch Trübsal hier
geht der Weg zu Dir.

3 Rühret eigner Schmerz
irgend unser Herz,
kümmert uns ein fremdes Leiden:
O so gib Geduld zu beiden.
Richte unsern Sinn
auf Dein Kommen hin.

4 Ordne unsern Gang,
Jesus, lebenslang.
Führst Du uns durch rauhe Wege,
gib uns auch die nöt'ge Pflege.
Tu uns nach dem Lauf
Deine Türe auf.

Source: Glaubenslieder #206

Author: Nicolaus Ludwig, Graf von Zinzendorf

Zinzendorf, Count Nicolaus Ludwig, the founder of the religious community of Herrnhut and the apostle of the United Brethren, was born at Dresden May 26, 1700. It is not often that noble blood and worldly wealth are allied with true piety and missionary zeal. Such, however, was the case with Count Zinzendorf. Spener, the father of Pietism, was his godfather; and Franke, the founder of the famous Orphan House, in Halle, was for several years his tutor. In 1731 Zinzendorf resigned all public duties and devoted himself to missionary work. He traveled extensively on the Continent, in Great Britain, and in America, preaching "Christ, and him crucified," and organizing societies of Moravian brethren. John Wesley is said to have been under obligat… Go to person page >


Jesu geh’ voran. N. L. von Zinzendorf. [Following Christ.] First appeared as No. 525 in the Bruder Gesang-Buch, 1778, in 4 stanzas of 6 lines. It is a slightly altered cento (probably made by Christian Gregor) from two hymns by Zinzendorf, on both of which see notes. Stanza i. is stanza x., iii. is stanza iv., and iv. is stanza xi. of "Seelenbraütigam, O du Gottes-Lamm"; and stanza ii. is st. xi. of "Glanz der Ewigkeit." In the text of 1778 it has passed into many German hymn-books, e.g. the Berlin Geistliche Lieder edition 1863, No. 634; and has become a great favourite, especially as a children's hymn. Translated as:—
1. Jesus, still lead on. A very good but free translation by Miss Borthwick, in the Free Church Magazine, 1846, p. 14, repeated, slightly altered, in Hymns from the Land of Luther, 1st Ser., 1854, p. 23 (1884, p. 26). From the Hymns from the Land of Luther it has passed into many recent hymnals, e.g. the People's Hymnal, 1867; Church Hymns 1871; Taring's Collection, 1882; Baptist Hymnal, 1879; New Congregational Hymnal, 1887, &c.; and in America in the Sabbath Hymn Book, 1858; Presbyterian Hymnal, 1874; Hymns & Songs of Praise, N. Y., 1874, &c, generally in full and unaltered.
2. Jesu! guide our way. A good and full translation by A. T. Russell,, written March 20, 1846, and published in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851, No. 61. This, generally omitting stanza iii., has been repeated in the Book of Praise Hymnal, 1867; American Presbyterian Hymnal, 1874; Evangelical Hymnal, N. Y., 1880, &c. The versions in the English Presbyterian Psalms & Hymns, 1867, and John Robinson's [some time Chaplain of the Settle Union, Yorkshire, who d. Jan. 1886] Collection, 1869, are partly from Mr. Russell and partly from Miss Borthwick.
3. Jesu, day by day. A full and close translation by Miss Winkworth, as No. 174 in her Chorale Book for England, 1863; and in her Christian Singers, 1869. Repeated in J. L. Porter's Collection, 1876, and M. W. Stryker's Christian Chorals, 1885.
4. Jesu! be our Guide. By L. Heyl, as No. 406 in the Ohio Lutheran Hymnal, 1880.
Other translations are, (1) "Jesus, lead the way," by J. D. Bums, in the Family Treasury, 1859, pt. i. p. 289, and his Memoir & Remains, 1869, p. 241. (2) ”O Jesus, show the way," in Dr. J. F. Hurst's translation of K. R. Hagenbach's History of the Church 18 and 19 centuries, N. Y., 1869, vol. i. p. 433. (3) "Jesus, day by day," partly from Miss Winkworth, as No. 1014 in Reid's Praise Book, 1872. (4) "Jesus, day by day, Guide us on our way," as No. 485 in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1886. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.]

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)