La tumba le encerró

Translator: George P. Simmonds

At four years, George sang hymns with great devotion and enthusiasm. When he was ten he felt called to be a missionary. He retained his love for the Lord and for music throughout his life. So much so, that after the age of one hundred years old even sang solos in large meetings and on television. He began his work as a missionary, along with his wife, Nessie, in Ecuador. Then explored the Amazon area and across the continent. Collaborated in the compilation of "Hymns of the Christian Life." He also worked with the Bible Societies in several South American countries. He then served as pastor of a Hispanic church in the United States of America. He was a prolific translator of 800 hymns and choral songs. He used some pseudonyms as G. Paul S.… Go to person page >

Author: Robert Lowry

Robert Lowry was born in Philadelphia, March 12, 1826. His fondness for music was exhibited in his earliest years. As a child he amused himself with the various musical instruments that came into his hands. At the age of seventeen he joined the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia, and soon became an active worker in the Sunday-school as teacher and chorister. At the age of twenty-two he gave himself to the work of the ministry, and entered upon a course of study at the University of Lewisburg, Pa. At the age of twenty-eight he was graduated with the highest honors of his class. In the same year of his graduation, he entered upon the work of the ministry. He served as pastor at AVest Chester, Pa., 1851-1858; in New York City, 1859-1861;… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: La tumba le encerró
Author: Robert Lowry (1874)
Translator: George P. Simmonds
Language: Spanish
Refrain First Line: Cristo la tumba venció
Publication Date: 1978
Copyright: ©Copyright 1967, renovado, George P. Simmonds. Todos los derechose reservados. Usado con permiso.



The gospel tune CHRIST AROSE captures well the drama of Christ's resurrection with the ascending ("rocket") figures in the refrain. Undoubtedly, the refrain line has greatly enhanced this hymn's popularity. Sing in harmony with crisp rhythms and marcato accompaniment on the refrain. After the final…

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