Let the world their virtue boast

Full Text

1 Let the world their virtue boast,
Their works of righteousness;
I, a wretch, undone and lost,
Am freely sav'd by grace;
Other title I disclaim,
This, only this, is all my plea,
I the chief of sinners am,
But Jesus dy'd for me!

2 Happy they whose joys abound
Like Jordan's swelling stream,
Who their heav'n in Christ have found,
And give the praise to him;
Let them triumph in his name,
Enjoy their full felicity;
I the chief of sinnes am,
But Jesus dy'd for me!

3 Blest are they, entirely blest,
Who can in him rejoice,
Lean on his beloved breast,
And hear the Bridegroom's voice;
Meanest follower of the Lamb,
His steps I at a distance see;
I the chief of sinners am,
But Jesus dy'd for me!

4 Jesus, thou for me hast dy'd,
And thou in me shalt live;
I shall feel thy death apply'd,
I shall thy life receive;
To bring fire on earth thou came,
O that it now may kindled be!
I the chief of sinners am,
But Jesus dy'dd for me!



Source: A Pocket hymn book, designed as a constant companion for the pious: collected from various authors #XXI

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

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The Cyber Hymnal #3679
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