Lord God, We All to Thee Give Praise

Full Text

1 Lord God, to Thee we give all praise,
With grateful hearts our voices raise,
That angel hosts Thou didst create
Around Thy glorious throe to wait.

2 They shine with light and heav'nly grace
And constantly behold Thy face;
They heed Thy voice, they know it well,
In godly wisdom they excel.

3 They never rest nor sleep as we;
Their whole delight is but to be
With Thee, Lord Jesus, and to keep
Thy little flock, Thy lambs and sheep.

4 The ancient dragon is their foe;
His envy and his wrath they know.
It always is his aim and pride
Thy Christian people to divide.

5 As he of old deceived the world
And into sin and death has hurled,
So he now subtly lies in wait
To undermine both Church and state.

6 A roaring lion, round he goes,
No halt nor rest he ever knows;
He seeks the Christians to devour
And slay them in his dreadful pow'r.

7 But watchful is the angel band
That follows Christ on ev'ry hand
To guard His people where they go
And break the counsel of the foe.

8 For this, now and in days to be,
Our praise shall rise, O Lord, to Thee,
Whom all the angel hosts adore
With grateful songs forevermore.

Source: Lutheran Service Book #522

Author: P. Melanchthon

Melanchthon, Philipp, son of Georg Schwarzert, armourer to the Elector Philipp of the Palatinate, was born at Bretten, near Carlsruhe, Feb. 16, 1497. From 1507 to 1509 he attended the Latin school at Pforzheim, and here he was already, by Johann Reuchlin, called Melanchthon (the Greek form of "Black Earth," his German surname). In October, 1509, he entered the University of Heidelberg (B.A. 1511), and on Sept. 17, 1512, matriculated at Tubingen, where he graduated M.A., Jan. 25, 1514, and where he remained till 1518 as private lecturer in the philosophical faculty. On Aug. 29, 1518, he was appointed professor of Greek at the University of Wittenberg, and in January, 1526, also Professor of theology. He died at Wittenberg, April 19, 1560 (Al… Go to person page >

Translator: Paul Eber

Eber, Paul, son of Johannes Eber, master tailor at Kitzingen, Bavaria, was born at Kitzingen, Nov. 8, 1511. He was sent in 1523 to the Gymnasium at Ansbach, but being forced by illness to return home, was on his way thrown from horseback and dragged more than a mile, remaining as a consequence deformed ever after. In 1525 he entered the St. Lorentz school at Nürnberg, under Joachim Camerarius, and in 1532 went to the University of Wittenberg, where he graduated 1536, and thereafter became tutor in the Philosophical Faculty. He was appointed Professor of Latin in 1544, then in 1557 Professor of Hebrew and Castle preacher, and in 1558 Town preacher and General Superintendent of the Electorate, receiving in 1559 the degree D.D. from the Unive… Go to person page >

Translator (sts. 1-10, 14, 16): E. Cronenwett

Cronenwett, Emmanuel, a Lutheran Pastor at Butler, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., contributed to the Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal, Published by Order of the Evangelical Lutheran Joint Synod of Ohio and other States, 1880, in addition to 20 translations from the German, the following original hymns, some of which rank with the best in the collection:— 1. A holy state is wedded life. Domestic Worship. 2. Faith is wisdom from on high. Faith. 3. Heavenly Father, Jesus taught us. Prayer. 4. Lord, Thine omniscience I adore. Omniscience. 5. O Triune God, Thy blessing great. Domestic Worship. 6. Of omniscient grace I sing. Omniscience. 7. Of Zion's honour angels sing. Ordination. 8. The precepts of the word are pure.… Go to person page >

Translator (sts. 11-13, 15): Joseph Augustus Seiss

Joseph Augustus Seiss (March 18, 1823–June 20, 1904) was an American theologian and Lutheran minister. He was known for his religion writings on pyramidology and dispensationalism. See also in: Wikipedia  Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Lord God we all to Thee give praise
Title: Lord God, We All to Thee Give Praise
Latin Title: Dicimus grates tibi, summe rerum
Author: P. Melanchthon
Translator: Paul Eber
Translator (sts. 1-10, 14, 16): E. Cronenwett (alt.)
Translator (sts. 11-13, 15): Joseph Augustus Seiss (alt.)
Language: English



This tune is likely the work of the composer named here, but has also been attributed to others as shown in the instances list below. According to the Handbook to the Baptist Hymnal (1992), Old 100th first appeared in the Genevan Psalter, and "the first half of the tune contains phrases which may ha…

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DEUS TUORUM MILITUM (sometimes called GRENOBLE) was published in France in the 1753 Grenoble Antiphoner as a setting for the text "Deus tuorum militum" (“The God of Your Soldiers”). One of the finest French diocesan tunes from the eighteenth century, it represents a departure in Roman Catholic h…

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The Cyber Hymnal #3707
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Instances (1 - 4 of 4)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Christian Worship: a Lutheran hymnal #196Text
Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #545TextPage Scan
Lutheran Service Book #522Text
The Cyber Hymnal #3707TextScoreAudio
Include 13 pre-1979 instances