Lord of mercy and of might

Lord of mercy and of might, Of mankind the Life and Light

Author: Reginald Heber (1827)
Published in 100 hymnals

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Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1 Lord of mercy and of might,
Of mankind the life and light,
Maker, Teacher infinite:
Jesu, hear and save.

2 Strong Creator, Saviour mild,
Humbled to a mortal child,
Captive, beaten, bound, reviled:
Jesu, hear and save.

3 Throned above celestial things,
Borne aloft on angels' wings,
Lord of lords, and King of kings:
Jesu, hear and save.

4 Soon to come to earth again,
Judge of angels and of men,
Hear us now, and hear us then:
Jesu, hear and save.

The Hymnal: revised and enlarged as adopted by the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in the year of our Lord 1892

Author: Reginald Heber

Reginald Heber was born in 1783 into a wealthy, educated family. He was a bright youth, translating a Latin classic into English verse by the time he was seven, entering Oxford at 17, and winning two awards for his poetry during his time there. After his graduation he became rector of his father's church in the village of Hodnet near Shrewsbury in the west of England where he remained for 16 years. He was appointed Bishop of Calcutta in 1823 and worked tirelessly for three years until the weather and travel took its toll on his health and he died of a stroke. Most of his 57 hymns, which include "Holy, Holy, Holy," are still in use today. -- Greg Scheer, 1995… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Lord of mercy and of might, Of mankind the Life and Light
Title: Lord of mercy and of might
Author: Reginald Heber (1827)
Meter: 7.7.7.5
Language: English

Notes

Lord of mercy and of might. Bp. R. Heber. [Quinquagesima.] Two forms of this hymn, and both by Heber, are found in his Hymns, &c, 1827. The first form, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, first appeared in the Christian Observer, Nov. 1811, p. 697, together with three additional hymns by Heber, and is set forth for the "Sunday after Christmas.” In his Hymns, &c, 1827, it is given as No. i. for "Quinquagesima," and reads, as in the Christian Observer:--

”Lord of mercy, and of might,
Of mankind the life and light,
Maker, Teacher infinite,
Jesus, hear and save !

"Who, when sin’s primaeval doom
Gave creation to the tomb,
Didst not scorn a Virgin's womb,
Jesus, hear and save!

“Strong Creator, Saviour mild,
Humbled to a mortal child,
Captive, beaten, bound, reviled,
Jesus, hear and save!

“Throned above celestial things,
Borne aloft on angels' wings,
Lord of Lords, and King of Kings,
Jesus, hear and save!

"Soon to come to earth again,
Judge of angels and of men,
Hear us now, and hear us then!
Jesus, hear and save!"

The second form appeared in his Hymns, &c, 1827, p. 21, and appointed for the Sunday after Christmas, or Circumcision." It is also in 5 stanzas, but differs from the first form in the following particulars, the 1827 reading being, Stanza ii., 1.1. Who, when sin's tremendous doom.
Stanza iii., 1.1. Mighty Monarch! Saviour mild!
Stanza v.

Who shall yet return from high,
Robed in might and majesty,
Hear us! help us when we cry!
Jesus, hear and save!

The use of this hymn is extensive. The first form is found in Kennedy, 1863; Hymnal Companion, 1876; Church Hymns, 1871; Thring, 1882, and many others: the second in Alford's Year of Praise, 1867; the S. P. C. K. Psalms & Hymns; New Mitre Hymnal; Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory, 1872, and others: mixed texts, People's Hymnal, 1867, and Windle; and, rewritten, in Morell and How, 1861. It is also found in many collections in slightly varying forms not here specified, the texts of which may be tested by the above readings. The original of 1811 has been rendered into Latin by the Rev. C. B. Pearson, as "Clemens hominum Regnator," and published in his Latin Translations of English Hymns, 1862, p. 82.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

ST. AMBROSE (56111)


CAPETOWN

CAPETOWN was originally composed by Friedrich Filitz (b. Arnstadt, Thuringia, Germany, 1804; d. Munich, Germany, 1876) as a setting for the text "Morgenglanz der Ewigkeit"; that text and tune were included in Vierstimmiges Choralbuch (1847), a hymnal compiled by Baron Christian von Bunsen and publis…

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IRENE (Scholefield)


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